Romans 5:1-11

Sunday, September 15th, 2013

Text: Romans 5:1-11

THE SECURITY OF THE JUSTIFIED

INTRODUCTION:

In my experience in the pastoral ministry, I have dealt with a number of people who needed assurance for their salvation. I have found that there are usually several reasons why people lack assurance.

1. They may actually be unsaved.

2. They may have been saved as young children and not be able to remember very much about it. I believe I fall into this category.

3. They may have sin in their lives for which God is convicting them and not know what to do about it.

4. They may not have been taught what the Bible says about the security of the believer.

In this text we want to deal with the fourth one. People often lack assurance because they have never really been taught what the Bible has to say about the security of the believer.

The second major section of Romans deals with God's provision of righteousness: justification by faith. In Romans 3:21-31 we see God's righteousness provided by faith; In Romans 4 we see righteousness by faith illustrated in the life of Abraham.

Thus, we see that righteousness comes by faith, but will it last? As we consider Romans 5:1-11 we see that those who are righteous by faith are eternally secure. Will it last? Yes, it will. Those who are justified by faith are eternally secure.

We see that -

I. OUR PRESENT EXPERIENCES ASSURE OUR HOPE - 5:1-2

Romans 5:1-2 - (1) Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ: (2) By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.

Our present experiences assure our hope -

1. In relation to the past - v. 1

because -

(1) We are justified

Therefore introduces an inference drawn from chapter 4. It is understood in the sense of accordingly, consequently, so, or then. This inference is based upon what Paul has written in chapter 4. We are not justified by works (vv. 1-8), by circumcision (vv. 9-12), or by obeying the Law (vv. 13-25). We know that these cannot bring about our salvation. Consequently, none of these things can bring us any peace.

By contrast, we know that we have been justified by faith. The certainty of this brings peace to our souls. Being justified is best understood in the causal sense of because we have been justified, since we have been justified, or inasmuch as we have been justified.

By faith indicates the means by which this justification comes. We believe what God has said regarding salvation in Christ and have placed our hope for eternal life in Christ's death for sin, His burial, and His resurrection.

Remember what it means to be justified by faith. It pictures God as the judge rendering His official verdict. It is a declaration of righteousness. We are forever afterwards treated by God as righteous, even though we are still sinners. It has to do with our relationship to Christ. We have placed our trust in Him as our personal Savior. It has nothing to do with any supposed righteousness on our part because there is none. It has nothing to do with the way we live as if we could earn the forgiveness of sin or admittance into heaven. It has nothing to do with church membership. The fact is that you can be a member of a church and not make it to heaven, and you can make it to heaven without being a member of any church.

Our present experiences also assure our hope in relation to the past because -

(2) We have peace with God.

We have peace with God

Whereas the wrath of God is directed against the ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, the one who has been justified by faith has peace with God instead. We are no longer at odds with God the Father. We are no longer God's enemies.

This peace comes through our Lord Jesus Christ. He provided for it when He shed His precious blood in dying for our sins. Had His death not satisfied the wrath of God which was directed against our sin, there would be no peace with God for us.

Our present experiences assure our hope not only in relation to the past, but also -

2. In relation to the present - v. 2a

Because -

(1) We have access into this grace.

By whom = through whom and refers to Christ.

The tense of we (i.e. believers) have access indicates an action accomplished in the past with its result continuing on. This means that it indicates a state of being. This access started at the instant of our salvation and will go on forever.

Access is the access or the approach. It is the specific access or approach into this grace wherein we stand. It is the only one; there is no other way of approach to God possible.

It is only through Christ that this access into grace is possible, and then, it is only by means of faith. This access has been provided for all persons through Christ in His death on the cross for sin, but it is only applied to the individual by means of faith in Christ and in His atoning work.

The context of Romans and of the entire Word of God leaves no doubt that this faith must be in the gospel message, i.e. that Christ died for our sins, that He was buried, and that He rose again from the dead.

Faith in anything other than the atoning work of Christ for the forgiveness of sin will do absolutely nothing for the individual. He might have all the faith in the world in his own abilities, in his own good works, or in something else; but his faith is only as good as the object in which it is placed. The only thing that counts is faith in Christ and in His redemptive work on the cross at Calvary.

Our present experiences also assure our hope in relation to the present because -

(2) We stand in grace.

That into which we have access is this grace wherein (i.e. in which) we stand. Formerly, we had been outside the realm of grace. Now that we have trusted Christ as Savior, we have been placed inside the realm of grace. It has reference to the fact that we have been saved by grace. It refers back to Romans 4:16 where the promise that Abraham was to be the heir of the world was said to be by faith in order that it might be by grace. Our position in Christ is one of grace, i.e. of undeserved (or unmerited) favor. We are saved. We do not deserve to be saved, but God in His mercy has extended His grace toward us and given us salvation. Apart from His grace, there would be no salvation for anyone.

The tense of we stand likewise indicates an action completed in the past with the results continuing on. It indicates a state of being into which we entered at the instant of our salvation.

Our present experiences also assure our hope not only in relation to the past and in relation to the present but also -

3. In relation to the future - v. 2b

because -

(1) We rejoice in hope, we are rejoicing

Rejoice = boast. The same word is translated in three ways in this context:

1. we rejoice (v. 2), i.e. we are rejoicing

2. we glory (v. 3), i.e. we are glorying

3. we joy (v. 11), i.e. we are joying.

Cf. Romans 3:27 - (27) Where is boasting then? It is excluded. By what law? of works? Nay: but by the law of faith.

Hope is not something we would like to see happen but which may not happen. There is no uncertainty expressed here. This hope is something that is definite and that can be counted on. It is certain of fulfillment. It is an expectation.

Our present experiences also assure our hope not only in relation to the past and in relation to the present but also in relation to the future because -

(2) Our hope is in the glory of God

The glory of God speaks of the completion of our salvation. It is the glory which is given (or produced) by God.

Cf. Romans 3:23 - For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;

Cf. Romans 8:29-30 - (29) For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brethren.

(30) Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he also called: and whom he called, them he also justified: and whom he justified, them he also glorified.

Not only do we see that our present experiences assure our hope, but we also see that -

II. AFFLICTIONS CANNOT DESTROY OUR HOPE - 5:3-5

Romans 5:3-5 - (3) And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience; (4) And patience, experience; and experience, hope: (5) And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.

Romans 5:3 And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience.

And not only so, but . . . also is used to make a smooth transition between verses 2 and 3. Verses 3-5 provide additional things in which believers boast.

We glory in tribulations, i.e. in oppressions or afflictions

Knowing that tribulation worketh patience is because we know that tribulation worketh patience.

Worketh is brings about, produces, creates

Patience is steadfast endurance, steadfastness, endurance

Romans 5:4 And patience, experience; and experience, hope.

We also know that patience produces experience and that experience produces hope.

Patience is steadfast endurance, steadfastness, endurance

Experience is the quality of being approved after having been put to the test = character

Hope is expectation

Romans 5:5 And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.

We also know that -

Hope maketh not ashamed = hope does not cause shame.

The supreme shame would be the disappointment of finding out that what we have believed was not true after all. We are not ashamed in Christ, no matter what we have to endure, and we never will be.

Cf. I Peter 2:6 - (6) Wherefore also it is contained in the scripture, Behold, I lay in Sion a chief corner stone, elect, precious: and he that believeth on him shall not be confounded (i.e. put to shame).

Cf. Romans 9:33 - (33) As it is written, Behold, I lay in Sion a stumblingstone and rock of offence: and whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.

Cf. Romans 10:11 - (11) For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.

The love of God = God's love for us rather than our love for God.

Is shed abroad = has been poured out

Its tense indicates that its action has been completed in the past with its result continuing on. The love of God is in a state of having already been poured out upon believers.

In our hearts is the place where the love that God has shown for us has been poured out. In other words, God had revealed to believers that He provided Christ to die for our sins.

By the Holy Ghost suggests through the Holy Spirit and indicates that it has been done by God the Father through the Holy Spirit. It is the Holy Spirit Who has revealed God's love to those who have been saved.

Which (i.e. Who) is given (i.e. has been given) unto us (i.e. Paul, the Roman believers, and all believers everywhere). It refers to the Holy Spirit Who has been given to all believers and Who, therefore, lives in them. The tense of is given indicates that the gift took place in the past with the result continuing on to the present time. The Holy Spirit was not only given to believers; He also indwells them; and He will continue to indwell them. He will never depart from them in this life.

Not only do we see that our present experiences assure our hope and also that afflictions cannot destroy our hope, but we also see that -

III. GOD'S LOVE AS SHOWN IN THE GIFT OF CHRIST CONFIRMS OUR HOPE - 5:6-9

Romans 5:6-9 - (6) For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. (7) For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die. (8) But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. (9) Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.

We see that our hope is confirmed because -

1. Christ died for us - vv. 6-8

Romans 5:6 For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly.

When we were yet (i.e. still) without strength indicates our spiritual condition at the time Christ died for our sins. It was one of inability. We could not save ourselves.

In due time suggests at the right time or at a definite time and implies that it was the time of God's choosing.

Christ died for the ungodly at the time appointed by God.

For is instead of and indicates the substitutionary atonement in which Christ took the place of the ungodly ones.

The ungodly refers to all persons because all are ungodly. They all deserve to spend eternity in hell, but Christ suffered in their place.

Romans 5:7 (7) For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die.

Scarcely is not readily or only rarely.

For a righteous man is instead of a righteous one.

Will one die is leading to the idea of the substitutionary atonement of Christ. The idea is that only rarely will someone die in place of a righteous one, but this will happen occasionally.

Yet is for.

Peradventure is perhaps, possibly, or probably.

For a good man is instead of the good one.

Some would even dare to die is literally someone even dares (i.e. has the courage or is brave enough) to die. Someone might possibly be brave enough to die instead of a good person, but this is not as likely as one dying instead of a righteous person.

Romans 5:8 But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.

But introduces a statement in mild contrast between what one would do for a righteous man or for a good man and between what God (i.e. God the Father) did for wicked sinners.

Commendeth is demonstrates, shows, or brings out.

That which God demonstrates is his love, and it is specifically His love toward us, i.e. for us.

In that is (in this) that. It means that the way God demonstrated His love for us is indicated in this regard, that while we were yet (i.e. still) sinners, Christ died for us.

Christ died for us is Christ died instead of us while we were still sinners. We were not righteous; nor were we good; rather, we were sinners who were totally undeserving of such grace. While some might die for a righteous one and others might die for a good one, Christ died for sinners.

We also see that our hope is confirmed because -

2. Christ saves us from wrath - v. 9

Romans 5:9 Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.

Not only has God's love provided for our salvation, but God's love has also provided for our future deliverance from His wrath as well.

Much more is to a much greater degree.

Then indicates that an inference is about to be drawn. It is understood in the sense of therefore, consequently, accordingly, or so.

Being now justified is understood in the sense of because (i.e. since or inasmuch as) we have at this time been justified.

By his blood indicates the means by which we have been justified. It is by means of Christ's blood.

We shall be saved means we shall be delivered. It is not speaking of the act of being saved from sin; rather, it is speaking of the deliverance from the consequences of our sin.

From wrath is that from which we shall be delivered. By contrast the wrath of God is being poured out upon all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men who suppress the truth in unrighteousness (Romans 1:18 ).

Through him indicates that our deliverance from God's wrath will come through the Lord Jesus Christ.

Not only do we see that our present experiences assure our hope, that afflictions cannot destroy our hope, and that God's love shown in the gift of Christ confirms our hope, but we also see that -

IV. GOD'S ATTITUDE TOWARD US HAS CHANGED; WE ARE RECONCILED - 5:10-11

Romans 5:10-11 - (10) For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life. (11) And not only so, but we also joy in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom we have now received the atonement.

Romans 5:10 For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.

If introduces a condition which, for sake of discussion, is assumed to be true. It is actually true for believers, but it is not true for unbelievers.

The condition is if when we were enemies we were reconciled to God by the death of his son.

If is, therefore, to be understood in the sense of since, inasmuch as, or assuming that.

When we were enemies means while we were enemies. We were enemies of God because of our sin.

We were reconciled to God indicates that something which had separated us from God has been removed and that we now stand reconciled to God. That which has been removed is our sin. We needed to be reconciled to God, but God did not need to be reconciled to us.

Were reconciled is passive indicating that we did not reconcile ourselves. God the Father reconciled us to Himself.

By the death of his Son indicates the means by which God effected the reconciliation. But, it wasn't just any kind of death. It was death by crucifixion in which Christ's blood was shed as an atonement for the sins of all humanity.

Much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life forms the conclusion of the condition.

Much more indicates to a much greater degree, even more, or still more.

Being reconciled is used in the sense of because we have been reconciled, since we have been reconciled, or after we have been reconciled.

We shall be saved by his life is we shall be saved by means of his (i.e. Christ's) life. Saved again refers to our ultimate deliverance from sin and from its consequences and has reference to those who have already been justified by faith in Christ.

Romans 5:11 And not only so, but we also joy in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom we have now received the atonement.

Verse 11 begins as did verse 3 with and not only so, but . . . also. It provides a transition between verses 10 and 11. We not only shall be saved by the life of Christ, but we also boast in God through our Lord Jesus Christ by whom we have already received the reconciliation.

We . . . joy is the same word translated we rejoice in verse 2 and we glory in verse 3. All three usages of this word are used in the sense of we boast, we glory, or we pride ourselves in.

In this verse it is in God (the Father) that we pride ourselves.

Through our Lord Jesus Christ indicates that we actually pride ourselves in Christ and in what He has done for us in providing our redemption and by doing so are actually priding ourselves in God the Father Who sent Christ to die for us while we were yet sinners.

By whom is used in reference to Christ and is understood as through whom.

We refers to believers. Have now received is already received. It is an action viewed as complete as a whole.

What we have already received is the atonement. This is the noun form of the verb translated reconciled used two times in verse 10. It, therefore, means the reconciliation. This reconciliation has been received through Christ, and is not available through any other source. It is literally the at-one-ment.

CONCLUSION:

Thus, we see that righteousness by faith will last. In fact, it guarantees that we will be saved not only from the power of sin in the present, but also from the wrath of God in the future.