Romans 10:1-13

Sunday, January 19th, 2014

Text: Romans 10:1-13

ISRAEL'S NEED OF SALVATION

INTRODUCTION:

We have noted the theme of Romans. It is the gospel of Christ which is the power of God unto salvation to everyone that believeth. In this gospel God's righteousness is revealed from faith to faith as it is written, the one who is justified by faith will live.

We have seen that all people lack righteousness

We have seen that God has provided righteousness for all when He sent Christ to die for our sins on the cross and raised Him from the dead. It is called Justification by Faith.

In Romans 6-8 we have seen God's provision for godly living - Sanctification

A question arises, however: what is going to happen to Israel? Since Israel as a nation has rejected Christ as Messiah, has the nation as a whole been set aside by God forever? Paul answers this question in Romans 9-11 .

As a nation, Israel has had opportunities to be saved; but those opportunities have been consistently rejected. In Romans 10 we see that Israel as a nation needs to be saved, but Israel is seeking to earn its salvation rather than to accept the means of salvation which God has provided.

In Romans 9:32 Israel stumbled at the stumbling stone. Paul wanted them to accept Christ as Savior rather than to continue rejecting Him.

In verses 1-5 Paul shares his burden for Israel. He has an intense desire to see the nation as a whole saved (v. 1). He knows that they have a religious zeal, but it is not based upon knowledge (v. 2). As a whole the people of Israel are ignorant of God's righteousness; instead, they are attempting to establish their own righteousness (v. 3). In verse 1 Paul expresses his desire to see the nation of Israel as a whole saved.

I. PAUL'S DESIRE FOR ISRAEL - 10:1

Romans 10:1 Brethren, my heart's desire and prayer to God for Israel is, that they might be saved.

By brethren Paul addresses the Roman believers. They are brothers in Christ.

My heart's desire is the desire of my heart, the will of my heart, or the wish of my heart.

Inasmuch as this is Paul's desire, he can also say that it is his prayer to God for Israel. Prayer is a general term for request or entreaty.

To God indicates the one to Whom Paul is praying, and for Israel is on behalf of Israel or concerning Israel. Paul is praying for the nation of Israel as a whole.

That they may be saved is simply for salvation and refers to the deliverance or preservation from sin and its consequences. He would like them as a nation to come to know the Lord Jesus Christ as personal Savior rather than to have them continue to stumble at the stumbling stone mentioned in 9:32.

II. AS A NATION ISRAEL IS ZEALOUS FOR GOD, BUT THEIR ZEAL IS NOT ACCORDING TO KNOWLEDGE - 10:2

Romans 10:2 For I bear them record that they have a zeal of God, but not according to knowledge.

For continues the thought of the previous verse in the sense of now.

I bear them record does not mean I bear witness to them directly; instead, it means I bear witness in reference to them or I testify regarding them.

What he bears record regarding Israel is that they have a zeal of God but not according to knowledge.

That they have a zeal for God indicates that they have a real and genuine interest in God and in seeking God.

But introduces a statement in strong contrast to they have a zeal for God.

Their zeal is not according to knowledge, i.e. not according to a complete (or full) knowledge, discernment, or recognition.

III. AS A NATION ISRAEL SOUGHT TO EARN ITS SALVATION, BUT SALVATION CANNOT BE EARNED - 10:3-17

Romans 10:3 For they being ignorant of God's righteousness, and going about to establish their own righteousness, have not submitted themselves unto the righteousness of God.

In verse 3 Paul explains why Israel has a zeal for God that is not according to knowledge, and this explanation is introduced by for.

Being ignorant is used in the sense because they do not know or because they are ignorant.

What they do not know is the righteousness of God. They are ignorant of it. It is the righteousness of God which is revealed from faith to faith (Romans 1:17 ). It is the righteousness of God which is apart from the Law, which is witnessed by the Law and the Prophets, which is by faith in Jesus Christ unto all and upon all that believe (Romans 3:21-22 ).

And introduces a second truth about the Jews in addition to being ignorant of the righteousness of God. They were going about, i.e. attempting or seeking to establish their own righteousness.

To establish means to put, place, or set; but when used figuratively as it is here, it is used in the sense of to confirm or to make valid. What they were seeking to establish, confirm, or make valid was their own righteousness. Unfortunately, they did not have any righteousness of their own; but they were ignorant of this.

Because they were ignorant of God's righteousness and because they were seeking to establish their own righteousness, they have not submitted themselves unto the righteousness of God.

They refers to the people who comprise the nation of Israel as a whole.

Have not submitted themselves is did not submit themselves, did not subject themselves, did not subordinate themselves, or did not obey.

It is the same term used in I Peter 2:13 where believers are to submit themselves to every ordinance of man (i.e. every human authority) for the Lord's sake.

It is also used in I Peter 2:18 where servants were to be in subjection to their own masters with all fear and in I Peter 3:1 where wives were to submit themselves unto their own husbands.

What the Jews have not submitted themselves to or obeyed is the righteousness of God by which Paul means the gospel message. It is by believing the gospel message that God's righteousness is obtained. The fact that they were unsubmissive to it means that they did not believe it.

Romans 10:4 For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth.

In verse 4 Paul takes a new line of reasoning in which he suggests that Christ has fulfilled the law of righteousness on behalf of everyone who believes.

For suggests now. End may be understood in two different ways here. End may refer to the termination or cessation of the Law, or it can be used in the sense of the goal toward which a movement is directed.

The man's relationship to the Law ceased when he trusted Christ as Savior (Romans 6 and 7). Christ fulfilled the demands required by the Law as far as every believer is concerned. Whereas the Law would never produce righteousness, Christ did. Now this is only true for everyone that believeth. It is true only for those who place their trust in Christ as Savior.

Romans 10:5 For Moses describeth the righteousness which is of the law, That the man which doeth those things shall live by them.

In verse 5 for introduces an explanation of the problem with Israel. In Romans 9:31 it was stated that Israel followed after the law of righteousness. In 10:3 it was stated that Israel was ignorant of God's righteousness and was going about to establish their own righteousness. In verse 4 it was stated that Christ is the end of the Law for righteousness to everyone that believeth, but Israel had rejected Christ.

Moses describeth the righteousness which is of the law. What follows is a quotation from Leviticus 18:5 . Paul's use of the name Moses clearly indicates that Moses wrote that portion of Scripture.

The quote from Leviticus 18:5 is that the man that doeth those things shall live by them.

The problem is that no one has done these things perfectly; so no one, except the Lord Jesus Christ, is going to be able to live by them.

By them is by means of them.

Thus, the righteousness which is of the law requires keeping the law perfectly, i.e. never disobeying any part of it, not even one time.

Romans 10:6-7 - (6) But the righteousness which is of faith speaketh on this wise, Say not in thine heart, Who shall ascend into heaven? (that is, to bring Christ down from above:) (7) Or, Who shall descend into the deep? (that is, to bring up Christ again from the dead.)

In verses 6-9 a statement in mild contrast is introduced by but. These verses describe the righteousness which is by means of faith in contrast to the righteousness which is by means of the Law.

According to verses 6-7, the righteousness which is by faith does not require that some great deeds be done.

The righteousness which is of faith is the righteousness which is by means of faith or by means of trust. It is this righteousness which the Apostle Paul has been speaking about throughout the book of Romans.

Therein is the righteousness of God revealed from faith to faith, as it is written, The just shall live by faith. It is expressed in Romans 1:17 as the theme of Romans.

The tense of speaketh implies that it always says the same thing; it never changes.

On this wise means in this way, thus, so, or as follows.

Say not prohibits or forbids an action before it has begun. Thus, it means never say or never begin to say.

In thine heart suggests where this should never be said. It is in your (singular) heart.

In verses 6-8 reference is made to Deuteronomy 30:12-14 . Who shall ascend into heaven is a quotation from Deuteronomy 30:12 . The point of the question is that it is not some great accomplishment which one can do in order to bring about his salvation.

That is, to bring Christ down from above is added by the Apostle Paul in explanation of this quotation. Bringing Christ down from above would not be necessary even if it could be done because Christ already came down voluntarily.

Romans 10:7 - Or, Who shall descend into the deep? (that is, to bring up Christ again from the dead.)

Verse 7 continues the quotation from Deuteronomy 30 . The next portion quoted is who shall descend into the deep? In order to indicate what he means by this quotation, Paul adds, That is, to bring up Christ again from the dead. The point is made that no one is required to do some great accomplishment in order to bring about salvation.

Shall descend means will go down or will climb down.

Into the deep is into the abyss, into the depth, or into the underworld. Deep is the same term translated bottomless pit in Revelation. The point of this quotation is that it is not possible for anyone to do this, nor is it necessary, because Christ rose again from the dead.

From the dead is out from among dead ones.

Romans 10:8-13 - (8) But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach; (9) That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. (10) For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. (11) For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. (12) For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. (13) For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.

The word of faith is clearly explained in verses 8-13.

Romans 10:8 But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach.

In verse 8 Paul continues his line of reasoning with a quotation from Deuteronomy 30:14 , But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart.

But at the beginning of the verse introduces a statement in strong contrast to verses 6-7 and is used in the sense of but or rather.

What saith it? is what does the word of faith say?

The word denotes what is said, the saying, or the expression.

Is nigh thee is is near you.

The fact that it is in thy mouth suggests that it is there to be spoken.

In thine heart suggests that it is there because it has already been believed.

Lest there be any doubt regarding what this word is, Paul makes it clear by writing, that is, the word of faith, which we preach.

That is is used in the sense of more specifically, this means, that means, or that is to say.

The word of faith is the word (i.e. the saying or the expression which) brings about faith (or which produces trust).

Which we preach is used to describe this word of faith. It means which we are proclaiming, which we are mentioning publicly, which we are speaking of widely, or which we are preaching. The content of what we preach is given in verse 9.

Romans 10:9 That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.

Verse 9 is a summation of the word of faith which Paul preaches. It is given in the form of a condition with two parts and a conclusion.

The condition is if thou shalt confess with thy mouth and (if) thou shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead.

The conclusion is thou shalt be saved.

To confess is used in the sense of declare publicly or acknowledge.

With thy mouth is by means of your mouth or with your mouth. Of course, it is by means of the mouth that one expresses what is in his heart.

The Lord Jesus is the One Whom you should confess with your mouth. It seems best understood in the sense of Jesus as Lord or that Jesus is Lord.

The second half of the condition is (if) thou shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead.

To believe is the ordinary word translated believe and is used in the sense of trust.

In thine heart is in your (singular) heart. It indicates the center of an individual's being. In other words, believe in thine heart is understood in the sense of believe deep down in your heart, believe genuinely, or believe sincerely.

That God (i.e. God the Father) hath raised him from the dead must be believed.

Hath raised is raised or raised up, and its tense suggests an event which occurred in the past. Of course, He remains raised up.

From the dead is from dead ones. The implication is clearly that Jesus had died and that He was subsequently raised out from among those who were also dead.

Thus, we have here a summary of the gospel message: 1) we must believe that Jesus is Lord, and 2) we must believe that He has been raised from the dead.

If someone will meet these two conditions, then God will take care of the conclusion: thou shalt be saved. Its mood indicates that it is something that will definitely occur if the conditions are met.

Saved means kept from harm, preserved, or rescued; and the Scripture indicates that it means not only to be saved from sin as far as its power is concerned, but ultimately from its presence as well as from its consequences.

Romans 10:10 For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.

Verse 10 explains the conditions in verse 9 as is indicated by for.

With the heart is best understood in the sense of by means of the heart or, perhaps, in the heart where the heart is the real inner man rather than the blood-pumping organ found in the chest cavity.

Man believeth is he believes or he trusts.

Unto righteousness is for righteousness and indicates the goal one achieves when he believes. He obtains righteousness.

And with the mouth is and by means of the mouth that confession is made unto salvation.

Confession is made is simply it is confessed, it is declared publicly, or it is acknowledged. It is the same word translated if thou shalt confess in verse 9.

Unto salvation indicates the goal that results from the confession or acknowledging. It is salvation by which Paul means deliverance or preservation from sin and its consequences. Verse 10 indicates that the confession comes as a result of the believing.

Romans 10:11 For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.

In verse 11 Paul appeals to the Scripture to establish his point.

For the scripture saith refers to the Old Testament.

What the Scripture says is, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. It is a quotation from Isaiah 28:16 , which says, He that believeth shall not make haste. This passage has been referred to before in Romans 9:33 , Behold, I lay in Zion a chief cornerstone, elect, precious, and he that believeth on him shall not be put to shame. It is also referred to in I Peter 2:6 .

Since it says it in the Scripture, it must be so. It must be true that whosoever believeth on him, i.e. on the Lord Jesus Christ, shall not be ashamed. Therefore, this individual who believes on Jesus is not going to fail to make confession with his mouth about what he has believed in his heart.

Ashamed means put to shame, and inasmuch as the ultimate shame would be disappointment that would be brought upon an individual should his salvation fail in any way, this is never going to happen.

Romans 10:12 For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him.

It does not make any difference whether the individual believer is a Jew or a Greek.

It is true for both as is indicated by for there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek.

Difference is distinction.

Greek is used in the sense of non-Jew or Gentile.

The second half of verse 12 explains the first half. For the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. It does not matter whether they are Jews or whether they are Gentiles.

The Lord is rich unto them in that He treats them very well. He gives them the riches of His mercy and His grace and saves each and every one of them.

Romans 10:13 For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.

Verse 13 indicates how the Lord is rich unto all them that call upon Him.

Whosoever is everyone who.

Shall call upon the name of the Lord suggests calling upon the Lord Himself in prayer and asking for salvation. This is given in the form of a condition. Whoever would call upon the name of the Lord means the same thing as saying if anyone will call upon the name of the Lord.

The conclusion is he shall be saved, and this is definite. There is no doubt about it.