II Corinthians 7:8-16

Sunday, March 16th, 2014

Text: II Corinthians 7:8-16

OUR TRIALS AS SERVANTS

INTRODUCTION:

The Lord is so good to us. He has provided for our eternal salvation when we really deserved eternal hell.

We need to be living for the Lord at all times.

We need to be living as closely to the Lord as we can at all times.

We also need to be appreciative of what the Lord is doing for us right now. He is controlling circumstances in such a way as to help us to live more fully for Him. He controls circumstances in order to help us be more Christlike in our lives. Of course, he does this by allowing various trials to come into our lives.

One of the ways He helps us endure trials is that He intersperses them with blessings of various kinds

In II Corinthians 7:2-16 we see what we as servants of the Lord can expect in terms of trials and blessings that go with them.

We have already seen that -

I. PEOPLE MAY NOT RECEIVE YOU WELL - 7:2A

II Corinthians 7:2 a - Receive us. . . .

In verse 2 Paul urges the Corinthian believers to make room for him in their hearts because, in spite of what his critics have said, he has done no wrong to anyone.

We have also seen that -

II. PEOPLE MAY MISUNDERSTAND YOU AND FALSELY ACCUSE YOU - 7:2B

II Corinthians 7:2 b - . . . We have wronged no man, we have corrupted no man, we have defrauded no man.

We have furthermore seen that -

III. YOU WILL BE BURDENED FOR PEOPLE - 7:3

II Corinthians 7:3 I speak not this to condemn you: for I have said before, that ye are in our hearts to die and live with you.

In verse 3, because he loves them dearly, Paul advises the Corinthian believers that he is not writing that they receive him in order that he condemn them.

Regardless of whether they live or die together, Paul loves them dearly.

In addition we have seen that -

IV. YOU MUST SPEAK BOLDLY - 7:4

II Corinthians 7:4 Great is my boldness of speech toward you, great is my glorying of you: I am filled with comfort, I am exceeding joyful in all our tribulation.

Verse 4 indicates that Paul's speech toward the Corinthian believers is bold, as is his boasting about them. He is greatly encouraged and joyful even though he is experiencing much tribulation.

We have also seen that -

V. YOU WILL BE TROUBLED - 7:5

II Corinthians 7:5 For, when we were come into Macedonia, our flesh had no rest, but we were troubled on every side; without were fightings, within were fears.

In verse 5 Paul speaks of his experience when he left Troas and came into Macedonia in search of Titus.

Finally, we have seen that -

VI. YOU WILL RECEIVE COMFORT JUST WHEN YOU NEED IT - 7:6-7

II Corinthians 7:6-7 - (6) Nevertheless God, that comforteth those that are cast down, comforted us by the coming of Titus; (7) And not by his coming only, but by the consolation wherewith he was comforted in you, when he told us your earnest desire, your mourning, your fervent mind toward me; so that I rejoiced the more.

Verse 6 indicates that God only allowed these disputes and feelings of anxiety mentioned in verse 5 to go so far. Then He intervened by sending Titus with news from Corinth. No one knows how much time elapsed after Paul arrived in Macedonia before Titus arrived from Corinth.

In verse 7 Paul indicates that he was encouraged, not only by Titus' arrival, but also by the fact that Titus had himself been encouraged by the Corinthian believers' desire, mourning, and attitude toward Paul.

We continue with -

VII. PEOPLE MAY BE HURT BY WHAT YOU DO AND SAY - 7:8

II Corinthians 7:8 For though I made you sorry with a letter, I do not repent, though I did repent: for I perceive that the same epistle hath made you sorry, though it were but for a season.

Although people may be offended, hurt, or irritated by what you say, it is never your intent to offend, hurt, or irritate them. You want so badly to help them spiritually, but they often resist your efforts.

In verse 8 Paul is no longer grieved that he made the Corinthian believers sorry for a short while as a result of what he wrote in his stern letter, which has not been preserved by the Holy Spirit.

For is the word ordinarily translated because and is understood in this sense here as well.

Though is even if, even though, or although. It introduces a conditional statement. The condition is though I made you sorry with a letter, and its structure indicates that, for sake of discussion, it is assumed to be true. The conclusion of this conditional statement is, I do not repent.

I made you sorry is I irritated you or I offended you.

With a letter indicates how Paul irritated or offended the Corinthian believers. It is a specific letter, i.e. the stern one. In I Corinthians Paul had dealt with their lack of unity, immorality in the church, lawsuits before the unsaved judges, problems in regard to marriage, problems with eating things which had been offered in sacrifice to idols, the covering of women in public worship, abuses of the Lord's Supper, abuses of spiritual gifts, questions about the resurrection, and instructions regarding the collection for the saints in Jerusalem.

However, problems persisted in the church at Corinth; so he sent another letter in which he dealt with issues more sternly. Paul himself regretted what he had written until he learned of its positive effect on the Corinthians. Upon learning of their repentance, he no longer regrets what he wrote. It turned out to be exactly what they needed.

I do not repent suggests that there are no regrets and is understood in the sense I do not regret (it).

Though I did repent forms another condition, whose conclusion is now I rejoice in verse 9.

Though is understood in the sense of even if, even though, or although.

I did repent suggests I was regretting (it). There was a period of time in which Paul was wishing he had not sent the letter.

For introduces Paul's explanation of why he no longer regrets having made the Corinthian believers sorry.

I perceive is I see in the sense that I am aware.

What Paul is aware of is that the same epistle hath made you sorry, though it were but for a season.

That the same epistle is the stern letter by which Paul had grieved or irritated the Corinthian believers.

Hath made you sorry is irritated you or offended you.

Though it were but for a season suggests if for a short period of time, if for awhile, or if for a moment.

The conclusion of the condition is the same epistle hath made you sorry.

The same epistle refers to Paul's stern letter which the Holy Spirit has not preserved.

Hath made you sorry is irritated you or offended you.

Although you may irritate people, it is not your intent to hurt them.

VIII. YOU EARNESTLY DESIRE PEOPLE TO BE RIGHT WITH GOD - 7:9-11

II Corinthians 7:9-11 - (9) Now I rejoice, not that ye were made sorry, but that ye sorrowed to repentance: for ye were made sorry after a godly manner, that ye might receive damage by us in nothing. (10) For godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation not to be repented of: but the sorrow of the world worketh death. (11) For behold this selfsame thing, that ye sorrowed after a godly sort, what carefulness it wrought in you, yea, what clearing of yourselves, yea, what indignation, yea, what fear, yea, what vehement desire, yea, what zeal, yea, what revenge! In all things ye have approved yourselves to be clear in this matter.

According to verse 9, Paul is rejoicing that the sorrow produced by his letter has resulted in the repentance of the Corinthian believers with the result that he does not have to come to Corinth and deal harshly with them.

Now is at the present time.

I rejoice is I am rejoicing or I am glad. It is in contrast to though I did repent in verse 9. Now I rejoice is the conclusion of a conditional statement begun in verse 8 whose condition is though I did repent.

Not that (possibly because) ye were made sorry is not that you were irritated (or offended). Paul was not rejoicing because they had been irritated.

But introduces that (possibly because) ye sorrowed to repentance, a statement in strong contrast to the previous statement, that ye were made sorry.

Ye sorrowed is you were irritated or you were offended.

To repentance indicates the ultimate result of their being sorrowed. They changed their minds, and their change of mind was so thorough that it resulted in a change of direction in their lives.

For is understood in the sense of because.

Ye were made sorry is you were grieved, you were irritated, or you were offended.

After a godly manner indicates how they were made sorry. It is also used in verse 10 where it is translated godly and in verse 11 where it is translated after a godly sort. It is literally according to God, in accordance with God, in conformity with God, or in respect to God.

That is understood in the sense of in order that or for the purpose that.

Ye might receive damage is you might experience loss (i.e. suffer damage, suffer loss, or sustain injury).

By us is from us (i.e. Paul) as the source of this (loss or injury).

In nothing suggests in no matter or in no thing.

II Corinthians 7:10 For godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation not to be repented of: but the sorrow of the world worketh death.

According to verse 10, godly sorrow is beneficial in that it results in a change of mind that leads to salvation; whereas, the sorrow of the world will result in a rejection of Christ as Savior and eternal suffering in the lake of fire.

For is again understood in the sense of because.

Godly sorrow speaks of godly pain of mind or godly grief.

Worketh speaks of causing a state or condition in the sense of works, brings about, produces, or creates.

Repentance is a change of mind which leads to a change of direction in life.

To salvation is unto salvation. It may speak of the salvation of the soul if the individual is unsaved. It may instead refer to the deliverance from sin which the Corinthian believers had committed, which, if not confessed and forsaken, might have resulted in physical death for those who were guilty. It is in contrast to death in the next phrase.

Not to be repented of is without regret.

But introduces a statement in mild contrast to repentance unto salvation not to be repented of.

The sorrow is understood in the sense of pain of mind or grief.

Of the world suggests produced by the world, i.e. the world system headed up by Satan, which is counterfeiting the kingdom of God.

Worketh is works, brings about, produces, or creates.

Death is what the sorrow of this world produces. It is in contrast to salvation in the previous phrase. If the people are unsaved, it is understood as referring to the second death in the lake of fire. If, however, the ones involved in the sin are saved, it is referring to physical death.

II Corinthians 7:11 For behold this selfsame thing, that ye sorrowed after a godly sort, what carefulness it wrought in you, yea, what clearing of yourselves, yea, what indignation, yea, what fear, yea, what vehement desire, yea, what zeal, yea, what revenge! In all things ye have approved yourselves to be clear in this matter.

In verse 11 Paul comments on the Corinthian believers' repentance following their reception of the stern letter and its result. They have demonstrated a genuineness in their repentance with which he is pleased.

For is understood in the sense of because.

Behold calls for closer consideration and contemplation and is understood in the sense of remember or consider.

This selfsame thing is the very same thing.

This same thing is that ye (i.e. you) sorrowed (i.e. were sorrowful, became sad, or were distressed) after a godly sort (i.e. after a godly manner).

What is how much or how great.

Carefulness is earnest commitment in discharge of an obligation or experience of a relationship. Carefulness is translated care in the next verse.

It wrought in you is it produced in you, it caused in you, it brought about in you, or it created in you.

Yea is used six times in this verse for emphasis and is understood in the sense of not only this but or yes indeed.

What clearing of yourselves is what defense of yourselves or what defending of yourselves. It refers to their taking steps to insure that their responsibilities had been taken care of and that no one would be able to legitimately accuse them of any lack of commitment or of any failure to carry out their responsibilities.

What indignation refers to a contempt for themselves because of the way they had let sin go on in their church.

What fear is what terror, reverence (for God) or respect (for people). It may refer to fear of Paul lest, in his apostolic authority, he come to them with a rod as mentioned in I Corinthians 4:21 , which says, What will ye? shall I come unto you with a rod, or in love, and in the spirit of meekness? It may also refer to a fear of punishment from God for their sins.

What vehement desire is what yearning, desire for, or longing, possibly to see Paul again.

What zeal refers to an intense positive interest in something in the sense of zeal or ardor, marked by a sense of dedication. It would certainly include living for the Lord and being pleasing to Him, but it may also include being zealous for Paul and zealous against the false apostles.

What revenge is what vindication, punishment, or avenging. This revenge likely refers to the individual mentioned in 2:5-8, which says,

II Corinthians 2:5-8 - (5) But if any have caused grief, he hath not grieved me, but in part: that I may not overcharge you all.

(6) Sufficient to such a man is this punishment, which was inflicted of many.

(7) So that contrariwise ye ought rather to forgive him, and comfort him, lest perhaps such a one should be swallowed up with overmuch sorrow.

(8) Wherefore I beseech you that ye would confirm your love toward him.

It may be that Paul is pleased with their defending him against some who would attack him.

In all things is in everything.

Ye have approved yourselves is you approved yourselves or you commended yourselves.

To be clear (to be holy or to be pure, i.e. to be innocent) in this matter indicates how the Corinthian believers had approved themselves.

It suggests that they had taken disciplinary action against an unnamed individual. Again, it likely refers to the individual mentioned in II Corinthians 2:5-8 . Inasmuch as Paul does not identify this matter more specifically, nearly 2,000 years after it happened it is impossible to determine who it was. They apparently waited awhile to take action and had done the best they could to straighten the matter out.

IX. YOU MUST CARE FOR PEOPLE SPIRITUALLY - 7:12

II Corinthians 7:12 Wherefore, though I wrote unto you, I did it not for his cause that had done the wrong, nor for his cause that suffered wrong, but that our care for you in the sight of God might appear unto you.

In verse 12 Paul states that the reason he wrote the stern letter was in order that his care or concern for the believers in Corinth before God, might be made clear to them. It was not because of the person who sinned or because of the one he sinned against, who was likely Paul himself.

Wherefore expresses result and is understood in the sense of as a result or consequently.

Though (i.e. even if, even though, or although) I wrote unto you forms the condition of a conditional statement.

I wrote refers to the stern letter which the Holy Spirit used but did not preserve.

Unto you is to you (Corinthian believers).

I did it not and suggests I did not write.

For his cause, where his refers to the one mentioned in II Corinthians 2:5-8 , is understood in the sense of because of him, on account of him, or for the sake of him.

That had done the wrong is the one who did wrong.

Nor is and not.

For his cause is again because of, on account of, or for the sake of.

That suffered wrong is the one who was wronged or the one who had been wronged. It refers to Paul himself.

But introduces a positive statement in strong contrast to I did it not for his cause that had done the wrong, nor for his cause that suffered wrong.

That is in order that or for the purpose that.

Our care for you speaks of Paul's earnest commitment, care, or good will on behalf of the Corinthian believers.

In the sight of God is before God or in the presence of God.

Might appear is might be disclosed (i.e. be shown, be made known, or become known).

Unto you suggests in order that our care for you before God might be made clear to you.

X. YOU WILL BE GREATLY BLESSED - 7:13-16

II Corinthians 7:13-16 - (13) Therefore we were comforted in your comfort: yea, and exceedingly the more joyed we for the joy of Titus, because his spirit was refreshed by you all. (14) For if I have boasted any thing to him of you, I am not ashamed; but as we spake all things to you in truth, even so our boasting, which I made before Titus, is found a truth. (15) And his inward affection is more abundant toward you, whilst he remembereth the obedience of you all, how with fear and trembling ye received him. (16) I rejoice therefore that I have confidence in you in all things.

Verse 13 indicates that Paul was encouraged in the Corinthian believers' encouragement and that he was even happier at Titus' joy because Titus had also been refreshed by them.

Therefore is because of this. The content of this is that our care for you in the sight of God might appear unto you in verse 12, which suggests that his writing of the stern letter had produced the effect he desired.

We were comforted suggests we have been comforted, we have been encouraged, or we have been consoled.

In your comfort suggests we were encouraged in addition to your encouragement.

Yea and is emphatic and is understood in the sense of indeed, really, or in fact.

Exceedingly the more is especially, all the more, even more, or even much more.

Joyed we is we joyed, we rejoiced, or we were glad.

For the joy of Titus is in addition to Titus' joy.

Because introduces the reason Paul was rejoicing in addition to Titus' joy: his spirit was refreshed by you all.

His spirit suggests deep within Titus himself.

Was refreshed is understood in the sense of has been refreshed, has been caused to rest, has been given rest, or has revived.

By you all indicates the ones who had refreshed Titus. It was all the Corinthian believers.

II Corinthians 7:14 For if I have boasted any thing to him of you, I am not ashamed; but as we spake all things to you in truth, even so our boasting, which I made before Titus, is found a truth.

Verse 14 indicates that Paul is unashamed of things he said to Titus about the Corinthian believers. Paul had apparently told Titus that the Corinthians would be all right and do right, and it turned out to be true.

For is the word ordinarily translated because.

If I have boasted any thing to him of you is the condition of a conditional statement. Its structure indicates that, for sake of discussion, it is assumed to be true; and it apparently was true. Therefore, if should be understood in the sense of because, since, inasmuch as, or in view of the fact that.

The conclusion of this condition is I am not ashamed.

I have boasted any thing is, I have made a boast about anything.

To him means to Titus.

Of you is concerning you or about you (Corinthian believers).

I am not ashamed is, I was not put to shame.

But introduces a statement in strong contrast to if I have boasted any thing to him of you, I am not ashamed.

As . . . even so introduces a comparison between the fact that all things Paul spoke to the Corinthian believers were true and the fact that his boast about the Corinthian believers to Titus was also true.

As is in such a way as.

We spake is, We spoke or, We said.

All things to you is to you Corinthian believers.

In truth is truthfully.

Even so is in this manner also, thus, or so also.

Our boasting refers to Paul's statements made out of his pride or confidence in the Corinthian believers.

Which I made before Titus (i.e. in the presence of Titus) regarding the Corinthian believers.

Is found a truth is has become truth.

II Corinthians 7:15 And his inward affection is more abundant toward you, whilst he remembereth the obedience of you all, how with fear and trembling ye received him.

Sometime after Paul wrote I Corinthians, he apparently left Ephesus and made what is known as a sorrowful or painful visit to Corinth. Unfortunately, things did not go well in Corinth. Sometime later, Paul wrote a stern letter to the Corinthians and sent it to Corinth with Titus. Because of the way Paul had been received in Corinth, Titus was concerned about how he would be received. He was greatly relieved when the Corinthian believers received him well. In verse 15 Paul comments that, although Titus had been fearful of how the Corinthian believers might receive him, Titus' affection for them was even greater now than it had been previously because of the way they had received him.

And his (i.e. Titus') inward affection speaks of the seat of his emotions in the same sense that his heart is used in modern English.

Is more abundant is is especially; and toward you indicates the direction of Titus' affection.

Whilst (i.e. while or because) he remembereth (i.e. remembers) the obedience of you all, i.e. the compliance of all you Corinthian believers.

How with fear (i.e. alarm or fright) and trembling (i.e. quivering) ye received him (i.e. you welcomed him).

II Corinthians 7:16 I rejoice therefore that I have confidence in you in all things.

According to verse 16, Paul's confidence in the Corinthian believers was not worthless, and this made him happy.

I rejoice is, I am rejoicing or, I am glad.

Therefore draws an inference from the previous verse and is understood in the sense of consequently, or accordingly.

As translated, that I have confidence in you in all things indicates the content of Paul's joy or happiness. It may instead indicate the cause of Paul's rejoicing and be translated because I have confidence in you in all things.

I have confidence in you indicates that Paul is certain of the Corinthian believers and is understood in the sense of I am confident of you or I am able to depend on you.

In all things is in everything.

CONCLUSION:

We need to desire God's refining process because we know that we will benefit from it. We can rest assured that, in between the trials which we can expect, God will also provide us with so many blessings that the trials will seem as nothing when we keep our eyes upon Him.