Matthew 9:1-13

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

Text:   Matthew 9:1-13

JESUS HEALED A PARALYZED MAN AND

ATE WITH TAX COLLECTORS AND SINNERS

INTRODUCTION:

 

The narrative about Jesus in Matthew 8 and 9 includes His cleansing of a leper, His healing of the centurion’s servant, His healing of Peter’s mother-in-law, His test for discipleship, His stilling of the wind and waves, His casting out demons at Gadara, His healing of a paralytic man, His call of Matthew, His answer to the Pharisees about eating with tax collectors and sinners, His answer to the Pharisees about fasting, His healing of Jairus’ daughter and the woman with the issue of blood, His healing of two blind men, His casting out a demon from a man who was unable to speak, and His compassion for the multitudes.

 

The miracles which Jesus performed demonstrated that He was the Messiah and that everything He said was to be believed.

 

    I.     JESUS’ HEALING OF A PARALYZED MAN – 9:1-8

 

Jesus is seen crossing from the east side to the west side of the Sea of Galilee and coming to Capernaum. A paralytic is brought to Jesus Who surprises everyone present by stating that the paralytic’s sins are forgiven. As a result of telling the paralytic that his sins were forgiven, some thought He was blaspheming. Having perceived what they were thinking, Jesus asked the people why they were thinking evil things in their hearts. Jesus asked which was easier: saying that the paralytic’s sins were forgiven or telling him to get up and walk. In order to show that He had the right to forgive sins, Jesus told the paralytic to get up, pick up his bed, and go home, which he did. As a result of Jesus’ healing the paralytic, the crowds were amazed and glorified God.

 

Matthew 9:1 And he entered into a ship, and passed over, and came into his own city.

 

In verse 1 Jesus is seen crossing from the east side to the west side of the Sea of Galilee and coming to Capernaum.

 

And he entered into a ship and passed over is and He entered into a boat and crossed over. What Jesus crossed over was the Sea of Galilee.

 

And came into his own city is and He came into Capernaum where He had moved following His rejection in Nazareth in Luke 4:16-30 . Matthew doesn’t record Jesus’ rejection in Nazareth, but Luke does. It occurred after the death of John the Baptist and marked the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry.

 

Luke 4:16-3016 And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up: and, as his custom was, he went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and stood up for to read. 17 And there was delivered unto him the book [i.e. the scroll] of the prophet Esaias [i.e. Isaiah]. And when he had opened the book [i.e. the scroll], he found the place where it was written [i.e. Isaiah 61 ], 18 The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised [i.e. those who are oppressed], 19 To preach the acceptable year of the Lord. 20 And he closed the book, and he gave it again to the minister, and sat down. And the eyes of all them that were in the synagogue were fastened on him. 21 And he began to say unto them, This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears. 22 And all bare him witness, and wondered at the gracious words which proceeded out of his mouth. And they said, Is not this Joseph’s son? [i.e. this is Joseph’s son, isn’t it?] 23 And he said unto them, Ye will surely say unto me this proverb, Physician, heal thyself: whatsoever we have heard done in Capernaum, do also here in thy country. 24 And he said, Verily I say unto you, No prophet is accepted in his own country. 25 But I tell you of a truth, many widows were in Israel in the days of Elias [i.e. Elijah], when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, when great famine was throughout all the land; 26 But unto none of them was Elias [i.e. Elijah] sent, save [i.e. except] unto Sarepta, a city of Sidon, unto a woman that was a widow. 27 And many lepers were in Israel in the time of Eliseus [i.e. Elisha] the prophet; and none of them was cleansed, saving Naaman the Syrian. 28 And all they in the synagogue, when they heard these things, were filled with wrath [i.e. they were filled with rage, they were furious], 29 And rose up, and thrust him [i.e. drove Him] out of the city, and led him unto the brow of the hill whereon their city was built, that they might cast him down headlong [i.e. that they might throw Him down over the cliff]. 30 But he passing through the midst of them [i.e. passed right through the crowd and] went his way,

 

Matthew 4:13 reports His move to Capernaum.

 

Matthew 4:13 And leaving Nazareth, he came and dwelt in Capernaum, which is upon the sea coast, in the borders of Zabulon and Nephthalim.

 

 

Matthew 9:2 And, behold, they brought to him a man sick of the palsy, lying on a bed: and Jesus seeing their faith said unto the sick of the palsy; Son, be of good cheer; thy sins be forgiven thee.

 

In verse 2 a paralyzed man is brought to Jesus, and Jesus surprises everyone present by announcing that the sins of this paralyzed man were forgiven.

 

And behold continues the narrative and is used to gain the hearer’s or reader’s attention.

 

They brought to him a man sick of the palsy suggests they were bringing to Him a paralytic. Mark’s gospel indicates that the paralytic was carried by four men (2:3).

 

The tense of brought indicates ongoing action in past time in the sense of were bringing.

 

A man sick of the palsy is a paralyzed (man).

 

Lying on a bed further describes this paralyzed man. The tense of lying indicates that he was in this state of being. He was confined to his bed, and they brought him to Jesus in his bed.

 

This bed was apparently a pallet or a stretcher. It wasn’t your Serta Perfect Sleeper Mattress. Mark’s gospel and Luke’s gospel indicate that, because of the crowd, the men who carried the paralytic uncovered the roof of the house and let him down through the roof to where Jesus was inside the house (Mark 2:4 ; Luke 5:19 ).

 

And Jesus seeing their faith includes, not only the faith of the men who carried the paralytic to Jesus, but also includes the faith of the paralytic himself because Jesus announces to him that his sins are forgiven; and they would not be forgiven if he were not a believer in Jesus.

 

He said unto the sick of the palsy is Jesus said to the paralytic, Son, be of good cheer; thy sins be forgiven thee.

 

Jesus addresses him as Son, the word for child. Here it is used as a term of familiar address in the sense of My son or My child.

 

Be of good cheer suggests be encouraged or take heart.

 

Thy sins be forgiven thee implies that the sum total of all the sins the paralytic has ever committed or ever will commit have already been forgiven to him. The tense of be forgiven indicates that its action occurred in the past and that its result has continued on. It indicates a state of being. It means that the paralytic’s sins were in a state of having already been forgiven when Jesus spoke these words. When his sins were forgiven, whether as Jesus spoke these words or whether they had been previously forgiven, is not stated. We don’t know how much time had elapsed from the time his sins had actually been forgiven until Jesus spoke these words. What we know is that at this point in time his sins had already been forgiven. Be forgiven thee has been translated in a way which emphasizes its existing result. It is interesting to note that there is no indication of this paralytic’s asking Jesus to save him and forgive his sins as if asking were a requirement for salvation. The Bible clearly indicates that believing the gospel message is the requirement for salvation.

 

Matthew 9:3 And, behold, certain of the scribes said within themselves, This man blasphemeth.

 

As a result of telling the paralytic that his sins had been forgiven, some thought that Jesus was blaspheming.

 

And behold continues the thought of the narrative and is also used to gain the attention of the hearer or reader.

 

Certain of the scribes is some of the scribes but does not indicate how many of the scribes or which scribes. Luke’s gospel indicates that there were Pharisees and doctors of the law sitting by, which were come out of every town of Galilee, and Judaea, and Jerusalem (Luke 15:17 ).

 

As far as the Greek text is concerned, the words said within themselves could be understood as said among themselves, which suggests that they actually spoke to each other the words which follow. However, in verse 4 Jesus knowing their thoughts suggests that some of the scribes spoke within their own minds but did not voice these words to others.

 

This man blasphemeth is, This (One) is blaspheming. They did not recognize that Jesus was God; and therefore, they thought that no man could announce to someone else that his sins had been forgiven because only God could do this.

 

Matthew 9:4 And Jesus knowing their thoughts said, Wherefore think ye evil in your hearts?

 

Jesus perceived what they were thinking and asked them why they were thinking evil things in their hearts.

 

And Jesus knowing their thoughts suggests because Jesus perceived their thoughts (i.e. because Jesus perceived the scribes’ reflections or ideas).

 

Said introduces the words Jesus spoke in the rest of this verse through the end of verse 6.

 

Wherefore? is why? or for what reason?

 

Think ye is are you thinking, are you reflecting on, or are you considering.

 

Evil is evil things, and in your hearts indicates the source of their thinking. It is deep within their innermost beings.

 

Jeremiah 17:9 The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?

 

Matthew 15:19 also indicates that the source of evil thoughts is the heart.

 

Matthew 15:19 For out of the heart proceed evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, fornications, thefts, false witness, blasphemies.

 

Back to Matthew 9:5

Matthew 9:5 For whether is easier, to say, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, and walk?

 

For introduces an explanation of the thought of verse 4.

 

Whether is easier? is, Which is easier? or, What is easier?

 

To say, Thy sins be forgiven thee is, To say, (your) sins have been forgiven to you (or are forgiven to you). The tense of be forgiven indicates that its action occurred in the past and that its result has continued. It represents a state of being, and it has been translated in a way which emphasizes the result of its action.

 

Or to say, Arise, and walk? is Or to say, Get up and walk. Actually, both are easy to say. Neither statement would be difficult to make. Of course, none of those present except Jesus could actually forgive the paralytic’s sins or enable him to get up and walk.

 

Matthew 9:6 But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (then saith he to the sick of the palsy,) Arise, take up thy bed, and go unto thine house.

 

In order to show that He had the right to forgive sins, Jesus told the paralytic to get up, pick up his bed, and go home.

 

As translated, but introduces a statement in mild contrast to Jesus’ question in verse 5. However, it may be intended to transition to the next thought in the narrative in the sense of so.

 

That ye may know is in order that you may perceive. It is the same word translated knowing in verse 4.

 

These scribes were thinking Jesus was blaspheming by telling the paralytic that his sins are forgiven. Jesus wanted them to perceive that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins.

 

The Son of man, where man is the generic term for human being, is Jesus.

 

Hath suggests has or possesses.

 

Power is authority.

 

On earth is on the earth (where these scribes happened to be) and indicates where Jesus had authority to forgive sins. He also had authority to forgive sin anywhere there was sin.

 

To forgive sins indicates the sort of power or authority Jesus had. In order to demonstrate that He really did have authority on the earth to forgive sins, He said something to the paralytic that the paralytic was then able to do and which everyone present would be able to observe.

 

Then saith he to the sick of the palsy suggests, Thereupon, He says to the paralytic.

 

What Jesus said is, Arise, take up thy bed, and go unto thine house.

 

Arise suggests get up.

 

Take up thy bed is pick up your pallet (or stretcher). It was what he had been lying on when carried to Jesus, i.e. it was the bed on which he had been confined.

 

Go unto thine house implies go home.

 

Matthew 9:7 And he arose, and departed to his house.

 

The fact that he was able to do this immediately after having been paralyzed demonstrated that Jesus had authority to forgive sins. Although those who observed this incident could not tell if this paralyzed man’s sins had actually been forgiven, they could certainly tell that he was able to get up and walk home. This miracle showed that the man’s sins had really been forgiven.

 

That this healing was instantaneous and complete is clear from the fact that, in spite of his being a paralyzed man who had been confined for some time to his bed, he was able to stand up immediately without dizziness, to pick up his pallet, and to walk home carrying it. He did not have to spend weeks or months in a rehab center getting accustomed to being in an upright position, strengthening his limbs, or learning how to walk.

 

And he arose suggests and he got up.

 

And departed to his house means that he went away unto his house and implies that he went home, no longer a paralyzed man.

 

Matthew 9:8 But when the multitudes saw it, they marvelled, and glorified God, which had given such power unto men.

 

As a result of Jesus healing the paralytic, the crowds were amazed and glorified God.

 

As translated, but suggests a statement in mild contrast. It may instead be intended to continue the thought of the passage but take it in a slightly different direction in the sense of then or now.

 

When (the multitudes) saw it suggests when the crowds (or the people) saw the paralyzed man, as the result of his healing by Jesus, get up, pick up his bed, and go to his house.

 

The multitudes marvelled, which means that they wondered or that they were astonished.

 

And glorified God suggests and they praised God.

 

Which had given such power unto men describes God. They praised God, the One Who gave authority such as this to men, i.e. to human beings. Of course, God had not given men the authority to forgive sins. They missed the point which was to show that Jesus was God and that He, therefore, had the authority to forgive sins because He was God.

 

. . . They completely missed the significance of the miracle. The visible healing of the paralytic was designed to confirm that the man’s sins had been forgiven, an invisible miracle. From this they should have realized that what they had witnessed was not a demonstration of God giving authority to men but of God’s presence among them in the Person of the Lord Jesus Christ. But they didn’t understand (Bible Knowledge Commentary).

 

  II.     JESUS’ CALL OF MATTHEW – 9:9

 

Matthew 9:9 And as Jesus passed forth from thence, he saw a man, named Matthew, sitting at the receipt of custom: and he saith unto him, Follow me. And he arose, and followed him.

 

And as Jesus passed forth from thence is understood in the sense of and as (or while) Jesus was going away.

 

He saw a man, named (or called) Matthew.

 

Both Mark and Luke refer to Matthew as Levi (Mark 2:14 ; Luke 5:27 ).

 

Sitting at the receipt of custom is sitting at the tax office.

 

And he saith unto him, Follow me is And He (i.e. Jesus) says to him (i.e. says to Matthew), Follow me.

 

The tense of follow me indicates ongoing action in the sense of be following Me or, inasmuch as Matthew was not yet following Jesus, begin following Me. He was calling Matthew to be His disciple.

 

And he (i.e. Matthew) arose is and he rose up or and he got ready.

 

And followed him does not mean that Matthew trailed down the street after Jesus. It suggests and he became a disciple to Him.

 

 III.     JESUS’ ANSWER TO THE PHARISEES ABOUT EATING WITH TAX COLLECTORS AND SINNERS – 9:10-13

 

In verse 10 Jesus and His disciples are seen eating in Matthew’s house with many tax collectors and sinners. The Pharisees saw Jesus eating with them and asked His disciples why He was doing this. Jesus overheard the Pharisees questioning His disciples and advised the Pharisees that sick people rather than well people need a doctor and told them to go find out what I will have mercy and not sacrifice means. He furthermore told them that He had not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners.

 

Matthew 9:10 And it came to pass, as Jesus sat at meat in the house, behold, many publicans and sinners came and sat down with him and his disciples.

 

And it came to pass suggests and it happened, and it turned out, or and it took place.

 

As Jesus sat at meat in the house suggests as (or while) Jesus was reclining at table in the house (i.e. as (or while) Jesus was dining in the house).

 

Behold is and behold and introduces a statement which is intended to gain the reader’s attention.

 

Many publicans and sinners came and sat down with him and his disciples indicates that many tax collectors and sinners came and ate with Jesus and His disciples.

 

Matthew 9:11 And when the Pharisees saw it, they said unto his disciples, Why eateth your Master with publicans and sinners?

 

And when the Pharisees saw it suggests and after the Pharisees saw (it) or and because the Pharisees saw (it).

 

They said unto his disciples means the Pharisees said to Jesus’ disciples and implies the Pharisees asked His disciples.

 

What they asked is, Why eateth your Master with publicans and sinners?, i.e. for what reason is your Teacher eating with tax collectors and sinners?

 

Matthew 9:12 But when Jesus heard that, he said unto them, They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick.

 

Jesus overheard the Pharisees questioning His disciples and advised them that it is sick people, not well people, who need a doctor.

 

But when Jesus heard implies but when Jesus heard what the Pharisees were asking His disciples.

 

He said unto them indicates that Jesus said to the Pharisees.

 

What He said was, They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick.

 

They that be whole is the ones who are in good health or the ones who are healthy.

 

Need not a physician is do not have need of a physician, i.e. they don’t need a doctor.

 

But they that are sick, i.e. But the ones who are sick (or ill) are the ones who need a physician.

 

Sadly, all have sinned and come short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23 ); but the Pharisees did not recognize their need for salvation. They thought they were well spiritually and that they had no need for a physician for their souls like the tax collectors and sinners who had assembled in Matthew’s house.

 

It is harder to show a lost person his need for salvation than it is to show him how to be saved. It is harder to get him lost than to get him saved.

 

Matthew 9:13 But go ye and learn what that meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacrifice: for I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.

 

It is understood in the sense of but go and learn what “I will have mercy and not sacrifice” means.

 

Learn implies that the Pharisees needed to gain some information they did not currently have.

 

I will have mercy and not sacrifice is the subject of meaneth.

 

Meaneth is the word ordinarily translated is.

 

I will have mercy and not sacrifice is being quoted from Hosea 6:6 , For I desired mercy, and not sacrifice; and the knowledge of God more than burnt offerings. By referring to this verse, Jesus’ is telling the Pharisees that although they are going through all the motions of serving God meticulously with their sacrifices, their failure to show mercy was evidence of their being sick and in need of the salvation He, the Great Physician, could provide. God wanted their hearts to be sincerely devoted to Him far more than He wanted their ritualistic sacrifices coming from their cold, callous, calculating, and unbelieving hearts.

 

Mercy suggests pity or compassion.

 

Sacrifice speaks of something that is offered or an offering, such as an animal sacrifice.

 

For introduces Jesus’ explanation of His statement.

 

I am not come is I did not come, and it has been translated in a way which emphasizes the result of its action.

 

To call the righteous is to call righteous ones. It means that the purpose of Jesus’ coming was not to call those who were right with God to repentance. There is no need for those who are righteous to change their minds about their sins and turn to God. The problem with this is that there is none righteous, no, not one (Romans 3:10 ).

 

But introduces a statement in strong contrast to I am not come to call the righteous.

 

Jesus came to call sinners to repentance.

 

Inasmuch as there is no one who is righteous, it means that all persons are sinners.

 

Repentance means a change of mind which is so thorough that a person realizes that he is a lost, helpless sinner, bound for the lake of fire. He realizes that he cannot save himself from his sins and that Christ died on the cross in payment for the sins of all humanity. As a result of this thorough change of mind, the sinner turns to Christ and receives Him as his personal Savior from sin and its consequences. Just like the tax collectors and sinners in Matthew’s house, the Pharisees needed to realize their lost condition and to receive Jesus as their Savior.

CONCLUSION:

 

Have you trusted Him as your personal Savior?

 

John 3:16 For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

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