Matthew 9:14-26

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

JESUS’ DISCUSSION OF FASTING AND HIS

HEALING OF JAIRUS’ DAUGHTER AND THE

WOMAN WITH THE ISSUE OF BLOOD

INTRODUCTION:

 

The miracles which Jesus performed demonstrated that He was the Messiah and that everything He said was to be believed.

In chapter 9 we have already seen –

    I.     JESUS’ HEALING OF A PARALYTIC MAN – 9:1-8

We have also already seen –

  II.     JESUS’ CALL OF MATTHEW – 9:9

We have furthermore seen –

 III.     JESUS’ ANSWER TO THE PHARISEES ABOUT EATING WITH TAX COLLECTORS AND SINNERS – 9:10-13

As we move on, we see –

    I.     JESUS’ ANSWER TO THE QUESTION ABOUT FASTING – 9:14-17

 

John the Baptist’s disciples asked Jesus why John’s disciples and the Pharisees fasted frequently but Jesus’ disciples did not fast. Jesus answered John’s disciples that His disciples had not been fasting because He was there but that the days will come when He will be taken from them and that His disciples will then fast. Jesus then makes two statements to illustrate the fact that He did not come to patch up the old system of Judaism; rather, He came to replace it with a new system. Patches from new cloth are not put on old garments lest they make the tear worse. Similarly, new wine is not put into old wineskins lest the wineskins break and the wine runs out. New wine is put into new wineskins and both wine and wineskin are preserved.

 

Matthew 9:14 Then came to him the disciples of John, saying, Why do we and the Pharisees fast oft, but thy disciples fast not?

 

Then suggests thereupon.

 

Came to him (i.e. came to Jesus) the disciples of John (i.e. the disciples of John the Baptist).

 

Saying introduces the question they had for Jesus, Why do we and the Pharisees fast oft, but thy disciples fast not?

 

Why? is for what reason?

 

Do we and the Pharisees fast oft suggests are we and the Pharisees fasting often and describes a customary practice of both groups.

 

But introduces a statement in mild contrast to why do we and the Pharisees fast oft?

 

Thy disciples fast not is Your disciples (i.e. Jesus’ disciples) do not fast or Your disciples are not fasting.

 

It was appropriate for John’s disciples to be fasting often because John was calling on the Jewish people to fast in preparing their hearts for the coming of the kingdom of heaven.

 

Matthew 9:15 And Jesus said unto them, Can the children of the bridechamber mourn, as long as the bridegroom is with them? but the days will come, when the bridegroom shall be taken from them, and then shall they fast.

 

Jesus answered John’s disciples that His disciples had not been fasting because He was there but that the days will come when He will no longer be with them and that His disciples will fast at that time.

 

What Jesus said to John’s disciples is introduced by and Jesus said unto them, i.e. and Jesus said to John’s disciples.

 

The structure of can the children of the bridechamber mourn, as long as the bridegroom is with them? indicates that it expects a negative answer. It is understood in the sense of the sons of the bridechamber are not able to mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them, are they? No, they are not.

 

The children of the bridechamber suggests the bridegroom’s attendants and refers to that group of the wedding guests who stood closest to the groom and played an essential part in the wedding ceremony.

 

Can(not) . . . mourn is are not able to mourn, are not able to grieve, or are not able to be sad.

 

As long as suggests for as long a time as.

 

The bridegroom is with them means the bridegroom is with the bridegroom’s attendants.

 

But introduces a statement in mild contrast to the thought that the bridegroom’s attendants are not able to mourn while the bridegroom is with them.

 

The days will come is simply days will come but does not indicate specifically which days these are which will come.

 

These days are described by when the bridegroom shall be taken from them which suggests when Jesus will be taken away from His attendants.

 

And then shall they fast suggests and at that time they will fast.

 

Matthew 9:16 No man putteth a piece of new cloth unto an old garment, for that which is put in to fill it up taketh from the garment, and the rent is made worse.

 

Although it was appropriate for John’s disciples to be fasting, it was not appropriate for Jesus’ disciples to be fasting because Jesus had not come to patch up the old system of Judaism. The system could not merely be patched up without making it worse. To illustrate this He appeals in verse 16 to the known result of patching an old garment with a new patch. Patches from new cloth which has never been shrunk are not put on old garments which have been shrunk lest they make the tear worse.

 

No man is simply no one or nobody.

 

Putteth is puts on.

 

A piece of new cloth unto an old garment is a patch of an unshrunken piece of cloth on an old garment.

 

The old garment has been previously shrunk; and when washed, the patch, which has not yet shrunk, will shrink and tear away from the garment and make the tear worse than it was before it was patched.

 

For introduces this explanation.

 

That which is put in to fill it up is referring to the patch.

 

Taketh from the garment is takes away from the garment or pulls away from the garment.

 

The result of the patch shrinking is that the rent is made worse, i.e. (the) tear becomes worse.

 

Matthew 9:17 Neither do men put new wine into old bottles: else the bottles break, and the wine runneth out, and the bottles perish: but they put new wine into new bottles, and both are preserved.

 

In verse 17 Jesus further illustrates why He did not come to infuse the old system of Judaism with new instruction. New wine is not put into old wineskins lest the wineskins break and the wine runs out. New wine is put into new wineskins and both wine and wineskin are preserved.

 

This is a second illustration of why patching up the old system of Judaism will not work.

 

Neither do men put is neither do they put or neither are they putting.

 

New wine is basically grape juice. The natural process of fermentation begins when the stems die or the grapes are picked from the stems. New wine is grape juice which is still fermenting but has not yet completed the process of fermentation. How far this process of fermentation has gone is dependent upon how much time has elapsed since the stems died or the grapes were picked as well as on the temperature.

 

New wine is not put into old bottles, i.e. into old wineskins. Old wineskins could be expected to be cracked and have lost their elasticity, i.e. they have lost their ability to stretch somewhat during the process of fermentation.

 

Else suggests otherwise.

 

The bottles break is the wineskins burst.

 

And the wine runneth out is and the wine is poured out (or the wine is spilled out).

 

And the bottles perish suggests and the wineskins are ruined.

 

But introduces a statement in strong contrast to people putting new wine into old wineskins with its normal result of the wineskins bursting and the wine being poured out.

 

They put new wine into new bottles suggests they put new wine into new wineskins.

 

Again, new wine is grape juice which is still fermenting.

 

Into new bottles suggests into new wineskins.

 

And both (i.e. the new wine and the wineskins) are preserved or are saved (from being ruined). The present tense of all the verbs in this verse (i.e. put, break, runneth out, perish, put, and are preserved) indicates normal, customary action. It is what normally happens with new wine.

Next, we see –

  II.     JESUS’ HEALING OF JAIRUS’ DAUGHTER AND THE WOMAN WITH THE ISSUE OF BLOOD – 9:18-26

 

A certain ruler of a synagogue came to Jesus and prostrated himself before Him. After telling Jesus that his daughter had just died, he asked Jesus to come and lay His hand on her with the result that she would live. Jesus and His disciples followed him to his home. While following the ruler, a woman who had had a twelve-year bout with bleeding came up behind Jesus and touched the edge of His garment. She was saying to herself that if she could just touch the hem of Jesus’ garment, her bleeding would be healed. Her hopes were realized when Jesus told her that her faith had made her whole. She was healed from that time on. Upon entering the ruler’s house, Jesus saw the flute players and the people carrying on emotionally. Jesus told the people that the ruler’s daughter was not dead, but they laughed at Him. After putting the people out, Jesus went in, took the girl by the hand, and she got up. The news of Jesus raising the ruler’s daughter from the dead spread throughout the region.

 

Matthew 9:18 While he spake these things unto them, behold, there came a certain ruler, and worshipped him, saying, My daughter is even now dead: but come and lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live.

 

A certain ruler came to Jesus and prostrated himself before Him. We learn from Mark 5:22 and Luke 8:41 that the ruler’s name was Jairus and that he was a ruler of the synagogue. After telling Jesus that his daughter had just died, he asked Jesus to come and lay His hand on her with the result that she would live. We learn from Luke 8:42 that his daughter was about twelve years of age and that she was his only daughter.

 

While he spake these things unto them is understood in the sense of while Jesus was speaking these things to them (i.e. to the disciples of John mentioned in verse 17).

 

Behold is used to gain the hearer’s attention.

 

There came a certain ruler suggests there came some ruler or there came a ruler. His name was Jairus, and he was the ruler of the Jewish synagogue.

 

Ruler suggests a Jewish leader or official.

 

The tense of and worshipped him indicates ongoing action in past time in the sense of and was worshiping Him, i.e. and was worshiping Jesus.

 

What the Jewish leader was saying to Jesus is, My daughter is even now dead: but come and lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live.

 

My daughter is even now dead is my daughter just now died or my daughter has just died.

 

But introduces a statement in strong contrast to my daughter is even now dead.

 

Come, lay thy hand upon her is come, put your hand upon her.

 

And she shall live indicates that this man is asking Jesus to raise his daughter from the dead and that he believed Jesus was able to do it.

 

Matthew 9:19 And Jesus arose, and followed him, and so did his disciples.

 

And Jesus arose means that He got up. Jesus had evidently been sitting down.

 

And followed him indicates that Jesus followed the ruler of the synagogue home.

 

And so did his disciples indicates that Jesus’ disciples accompanied them.

 

Matthew 9:20 And, behold, a woman, which was diseased with an issue of blood twelve years, came behind him, and touched the hem of his garment.

 

And behold continues the narrative and prompts the attention of the reader, introducing something unexpected. It suggests all of a sudden.

 

A woman, which was diseased with an issue of blood twelve years is a woman bleeding twelve years or a woman suffering with a hemorrhage (for) twelve years. Furthermore, it is apparent from the Greek text that her bleeding had been going on throughout (these) twelve years.

 

Came behind him means that the woman came behind Jesus.

 

This woman touched the hem of his garment, i.e. with her hand she purposely made contact with the hem (i.e. with the border, with the edge, or with the fringe) of Jesus’ cloak (or robe).

 

Matthew 9:21 For she said within herself, If I may but touch his garment, I shall be whole.

 

For she said within herself is for she was saying in herself.

 

What she was saying is in the form of a conditional statement. The condition is if I may but touch his garment, and the conclusion is I shall be whole.

 

It is if only I may touch His garment (i.e. His cloak or His robe). The structure of the condition indicates that she made no assumption regarding whether she would actually be able to touch Jesus’ cloak. However, she believed that if she did, she would be healed of her bleeding.

 

I shall be whole is I will be saved (or delivered) from this malady, which means that she would be healed or made well from her bleeding.

 

Matthew 9:22 But Jesus turned him about, and when he saw her, he said, Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole. And the woman was made whole from that hour.

 

Her hopes were realized when Jesus told her that her faith had made her whole. She was healed from that time on.

 

As translated, but introduces a statement in mild contrast to this woman’s touching the hem of His garment. It might instead merely transition into the thought of verse 22 in the sense of then or now.

 

Jesus turned him about, and when he saw her is literally having turned around and having seen her (i.e. having seen the woman who had touched the hem of His cloak).

 

What He said to her is, Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole.

 

Daughter is a friendly way of greeting her as someone’s daughter.

 

Be of good comfort is be enheartened or don’t be afraid, and its tense indicates continuing action. Although she may not have realized it quite yet, Jesus told her that she was now well.

 

Thy faith is your faith (i.e. your belief or your trust).

 

Hath made thee whole is has saved you (from your hemorrhaging) in the sense of has restored your health or has made you well. The tense of hath made . . . whole indicates that its action had already taken place by the time Jesus said this and was continuing. She was now in a state of having been healed from her bleeding.

 

Her faith had also saved her from sin and its consequences. Her faith that Jesus would be able to heal her demonstrated that she had already believed that Jesus was the promised Messiah.

 

And the woman was made whole from that hour is and the woman was saved (i.e. delivered from her hemorrhaging, restored to health, or made well) from that time (i.e. from the time she touched the hem of Jesus’ robe).

 

Matthew 9:23 And when Jesus came into the ruler’s house, and saw the minstrels and the people making a noise.

 

Upon entering the ruler’s house, Jesus saw the flute players and the people carrying on emotionally.

 

And continues the thought of Jesus going to the ruler’s home and healing the woman with the issue of blood while on His way.

 

When Jesus came into the ruler’s house places Jesus inside where He saw the minstrels (i.e. the flutists or the flute players) and the people (i.e. the crowd or the throng) making a noise (i.e. troubled, aroused, distressed or in disorder). It suggests that this was a rather large gathering of people inside the ruler’s home making a lot of noise with their wailing over the loss of the ruler’s daughter.

 

Matthew 9:24 He said unto them, Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleepeth. And they laughed him to scorn.

 

He said unto them is literally Jesus says to them, i.e. to the crowd of people in the ruler’s home.

 

Said has been translated as a historical present.

 

Give place is go away and suggests get out. Its tense suggests the beginning of an ongoing action in the sense of begin going away, begin getting out or perhaps, start leaving.

 

For the maid is not dead, but sleepeth is Jesus’ explanation of why these people should be getting out.

 

For is used in the sense of because.

 

The maid is the girl, the twelve-year-old daughter of the ruler of the synagogue.

 

Is not dead is did not die and has been translated in a way which emphasizes the result of its action. Inasmuch as she did not die, she is still alive.

 

But introduces a statement in strong contrast to is not dead.

 

Sleepeth is (she) is sleeping or (she) is asleep. It seems that the girl had actually died and that by His saying that she is sleeping, He was announcing His intent to raise her from the dead.

 

In response to Jesus’ telling the crowd of people that the girl was not dead but sleeping, Matthew writes, And they laughed him to scorn, i.e. they were laughing at Him (or they were ridiculing Him).

 

Matthew 9:25 But when the people were put forth, he went in, and took her by the hand, and the maid arose.

 

As translated, but introduces a statement in mild contrast to the crowd’s ridiculing Jesus because He told them that the girl was sleeping and not dead. It might instead merely transition into the thought of verse 24 in the sense of then or now.

 

When the people were put forth is when the crowd was put out.

 

He [i.e. Jesus] went in.

 

He took her by the hand suggests He took her by (her) hand.

 

Matthew states the result of Jesus’ taking her by the hand is the maid arose, i.e. the girl rose up (or got up).

 

Matthew 9:26 And the fame hereof went abroad into all that land.

 

The news of Jesus raising the ruler’s daughter from the dead spread throughout the region.

 

And the fame hereof is and this report or and this news.

 

Went abroad into all that land implies went out throughout all that land.

CONCLUSION:

 

Jesus’ miraculous healing of the woman with the issue of blood and his raising Jairus’ daughter from the dead demonstrate that Jesus was Who He claimed to be: God the Son, the Messiah, Who would die on the cross for the sins of all humanity and thereby provide salvation for all who would place their trust in Him.

 

Have you trusted Him as your personal Savior?

Scriptures