Matthew 13:24-30, 36-43

Sunday, February 12th, 2017

THE PARABLE OF THE WHEAT

AND THE TARES

INTRODUCTION:

 

The program of the King includes the narrative about Jesus (11:2 - 12:50), the parables of the kingdom (13:1-52), and the concluding statement, And it came to pass, that when Jesus had finished these parables, he departed thence (13:53).

 

The parables of the Kingdom include the parable of the sower and the soils, the purpose of the parables, the parable of the sower and the soils explained, the parable of the wheat and the tares, the parable of the mustard seed, the parable of the leaven, the explanation that the use of parables fulfills prophecy, the parable of the tares explained, the parable of the hidden treasure, the parable of the pearl of great price, the parable of the dragnet, and the treasury of truth.

 

    I.     THE PARABLE STATED – 13:24-30

 

In verse 24 Jesus begins another parable in which He likens the kingdom of heaven to a man who sowed good wheat seed in his field, but an enemy sowed tares among the wheat. Both the wheat and the tares grew. When the wheat produced fruit, the tares also appeared. When his servants asked where the tares had come from, the owner responded that an enemy had sown the tares among the wheat. The servants asked the owner if they should gather up the tares but were told not to gather them at this time lest they also root up the wheat along with the tares. The owner then advises his servants that the tares should be separated from the wheat at the time of the harvest.

 

Matthew 13:24 Another parable put he forth unto them, saying, The kingdom of heaven is likened unto a man which sowed good seed in his field.

 

Another parable is another parable of the same kind (as the parable of the sower and the soils).

 

Put he forth unto them suggests that in His teaching Jesus put before His audience. His audience consisted of disciples as well as people such as the scribes and Pharisees who rejected Him.

 

Saying introduces how Jesus put this parable before His audience. He spoke it. The parable continues through verse 30.

 

The kingdom of heaven is likened unto suggests the kingdom of heaven may be compared to.

 

A man which sowed good seed in his field is a man who sowed good seed in his field, where man is the generic term for human being.

 

Matthew 13:25 But while men slept, his enemy came and sowed tares among the wheat, and went his way.

 

But introduces a statement in mild contrast to the man sowing good seed in his own field in verse 24.

 

While men slept suggests while men were sleeping, where the term for men is the generic term for human beings.

 

His enemy came and sowed tares among the wheat.

 

In contrast to the good seed the owner of the field had sown, the enemy sowed tares, a troublesome weed known as darnel or cheat, which resembled the wheat.

 

Among the wheat suggests in the middle of (or in the midst of) the wheat (or grain). He sowed the tares in the same field where the good wheat seed had been sown.

 

And went his way means that the enemy went away.

 

Matthew 13:26 But when the blade was sprung up, and brought forth fruit, then appeared the tares also.

 

As translated, but introduces a statement in mild contrast to the enemy sowing tares among the wheat. It may instead merely transition to the next thought in the narrative in the sense of and, now, or then.

 

When the blade was sprung up suggests when the blade emerged.

 

The blade is the grass-like stem and is used of the stalks of grain in their early, grass-like stages.

 

And brought forth fruit, which refers to the grain, suggests and yielded (or produced) fruit.

 

Then suggests at that time.

 

Appeared the tares also indicates that the tares also became visible (or were revealed).

 

The difference between the grain sown by the owner and the tares sown by the enemy became evident when the fruit was able to be seen. The fruit produced by the tares differed from the fruit produced by the wheat or grain sown by the owner.

 

Matthew 13:27 So the servants of the householder came and said unto him, Sir, didst not thou sow good seed in thy field? from whence then hath it tares?

 

So is the same word translated but in the previous verse. It transitions to the next thought in the narrative in the sense of and or then.

 

The servants of the householder is the slaves of the master of the house (or of the landowner).

 

Came and said unto him suggests came and asked him, i.e. asked the master of the house (or asked the landowner), the one who had planted the good seed.

 

Sir, didst not thou sow good seed in thy field? is a question whose structure in the Greek text indicates that it is expecting a positive answer. It is understood in the sense of Sir, you did sow good seed in your field, didn’t you? and assumes, Yes, you did.

 

Sir is the term used for lord or master.

 

From whence then hath it tares? is from where, therefore, does it have the darnel (or cheat)?

 

Matthew 13:28 He said unto them, An enemy hath done this. The servants said unto him, Wilt thou then that we go and gather them up?

 

He (i.e. the householder, the master of the house, or the landowner) said unto them (i.e. said to them or said to his slaves).

 

What he said is, An enemy hath done this is an enemy, a man, did this (i.e. sowed the tares among the good seed he had previously sown).

 

Hath done has been translated in a way which emphasizes the result of its action.

 

The servants said unto him, Wilt thou then that we go and gather them up?, which suggests, Do you wish, therefore, that going, we should gather them (i.e. the tares, darnel, or cheat)?

 

Go gather them up suggests go pick them.

 

Matthew 13:29 But he said, Nay; lest while ye gather up the tares, ye root up also the wheat with them.

 

But transitions from the question the man’s slaves asked to his answer.

 

He said introduces what the master of the house or landowner said.

 

Nay is no.

 

Lest suggests in order that you not.

 

While ye gather up the tares (i.e. the darnel or the cheat) suggests when you are gathering up the tares.

 

Ye root up also the wheat with them is you uproot the wheat together with them (i.e. together with the tares, darnel, or cheat).

 

The thought is, No, in order that when gathering up the tares, you not uproot the wheat with the tares.

 

Matthew 13:30 Let both grow together until the harvest: and in the time of harvest I will say to the reapers, Gather ye together first the tares, and bind them in bundles to burn them: but gather the wheat into my barn.

 

Let both grow together until the harvest is permit (or allow) both (i.e. both the wheat and the tares) to grow together until the harvest.

 

And in the time of the harvest suggests the time when the crop is to be harvested.

 

I will say to the reapers indicates that it is the lord of the house who will instruct those who are doing the reaping or harvesting.

 

Gather ye together first the tares suggests, First, gather together the darnel.

 

And bind them in bundles to burn them suggests and tie them (i.e. tie the darnel) into bundles to burn them up (i.e. for the purpose of burning them up).

 

But introduces a statement in mild contrast to the master’s instruction to the harvesters regarding what to do with the darnel.

 

Gather the wheat into my barn suggests gather in the wheat into my storehouse.

 

  II.     THE PARABLE EXPLAINED – 13:36-43

 

Jesus’ disciples privately ask Him to explain the meaning of the parable of the tares. It is Jesus Himself Who sows the good seed. He identifies the good seed as the children of God but the tares as the children of Satan. The one who sowed the tares is the devil. The harvest takes place at the end of the age, and the angels are the reapers. The tares are burned in the fire, and the children of Satan will likewise be thrown into the fire. Christ’s angels will gather out of His kingdom all those who commit sin, and they will be cast into a furnace of fire where there will be wailing and gnashing of teeth. The righteous, however, will shine as the sun in God the Father’s kingdom.

 

Matthew 13:36 Then Jesus sent the multitude away, and went into the house: and his disciples came unto him, saying, Declare unto us the parable of the tares of the field.

 

Then suggests thereupon.

 

Jesus sent the multitude away and went into the house out of which He had gone in verse 1.

 

And his disciples came unto him is and His disciples approached Him. They were apparently in the house with Him.

 

Saying introduces what they requested when they came to Him.

 

What they were requesting is, Declare unto us the parable of the tares of the field.

 

Declare unto us is explain (or interpret) to us.

 

The parable of the tares of the field is the parable which Jesus taught in verses 24-30. A man had sown good wheat seed in his field and an enemy had come and sowed tares (i.e. darnel or cheat) among the wheat.

 

Matthew 13:37 He answered and said unto them, He that soweth the good seed is the Son of man.

 

He answered and said unto them means Jesus answered and said to His disciples.

 

He that soweth the good seed is the Son of man means that Jesus Himself is the One Who sowed the wheat.

 

Matthew 13:38 The field is the world; the good seed are the children of the kingdom; but the tares are the children of the wicked one.

 

The field is the world suggests that the field encompasses the entire earth.

 

The good seed are the children of the kingdom is literally, the seed, the good ones, these are the sons of the kingdom. It means that they have believed the message preached by John the Baptist and Jesus and had placed their trust in Jesus as their Messiah. They are saved people.

 

But introduces a statement in mild contrast to the good seed are the children of the kingdom.

 

The tares are the children of the wicked one is the darnel (or cheat) are the sons of the wicked (one), which means that they are sons of Satan and are, therefore, unsaved people because they have rejected Jesus as their Messiah.

 

 

Matthew 13:39 The enemy that sowed them is the devil; the harvest is the end of the world; and the reapers are the angels.

 

The enemy that sowed them (i.e. the tares) is the devil (i.e. Satan), who is a counterfeiter.

 

The harvest indicates the time when the sons of the kingdom will be separated from the sons of the devil.

 

The harvest is the end of the world, i.e. the harvest is (the) completion (or close) of the (present) age.

 

The reapers (i.e. those who will separate the wheat from the tares) are the angels, and they will have no trouble distinguishing between the genuinely saved people and the genuinely unsaved people.

 

Matthew 13:40 As therefore the tares are gathered and burned in the fire; so shall it be in the end of this world.

 

As (i.e. just as) introduces a comparison of the words which follow it in the first half of this verse with the words following so in the second half of this verse.

 

Therefore introduces an inference drawn from the facts Jesus has stated in verses 37-39.

 

The tares (i.e. the darnel or the cheat) are gathered (or picked) and burned (i.e. burned up or consumed) in the fire at the time of the harvest after they are separated from the wheat.

 

So shall it be at the end of this age is so it will be at the end (i.e. at the completion or close) of this (present) age. What will happen at the end of this age is stated in the next verse.

 

Matthew 13:41 The Son of man shall send forth his angels, and they shall gather out of his kingdom all things that offend, and them which do iniquity.

 

The Son of man is Jesus.

 

Shall send forth his angels is will send (or will send out) His angels. The tense and mood of shall send forth indicate that it is predictive of something which will definitely occur in the future.

 

And connects a second statement which indicates that a second thing will also definitely happen in the future.

 

They (i.e. the Son of man’s angels) shall gather is they will gather (or they will collect).

 

Out of his kingdom, i.e. out of the kingdom of heaven, indicates that they were in the kingdom of heaven and were removed out of it. Although they were unsaved persons, they were within the kingdom of heaven. This suggests that the kingdom of heaven is the realm of profession of salvation rather than the realm of possession of salvation. Inasmuch as the Bible clearly teaches that genuinely saved people will never lose their salvation, these individuals had never been saved in the first place.

 

Many people who are unsaved profess to be Christians. Those who do not get saved before they die are the tares among the wheat.

 

All things that offend, and them which do iniquity indicates what and who will be removed from the kingdom of heaven.

 

All things that offend suggests all the stumbling blocks, all the things that cause sin, or all things that are offensive.

 

And them which do iniquity suggests all the ones who are committing (i.e. who are practicing or who are guilty of) lawlessness (or evil).

 

Matthew 13:42 And shall cast them into a furnace of fire: there shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth.

 

And introduces a third thing which will definitely occur in the future.

 

The angels shall cast them (i.e. the ones which do iniquity) into a furnace of fire, i.e. into the fiery furnace, which is a reference to Gehenna, the lake of fire, also known as hell.

 

There is in that place, i.e. in the fiery furnace.

 

Shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth is the wailing and the gnashing of the teeth will be in the sense of will occur or will take place.

 

Wailing is weeping or crying.

 

Gnashing of teeth speaks of teeth grinding together because of pain.

 

Matthew 13:43 Then shall the righteous shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Who hath ears to hear, let him hear.

 

Then is at that time.

 

Shall the righteous shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of their Father is the righteous ones will shine like the sun (shines) in the kingdom of their Father (i.e. in God the Father’s kingdom).

 

It is reminiscent of Daniel 12:3 ,

 

Daniel 12:3 And they that be wise shall shine as the brightness of the firmament; and they that turn many to righteousness as the stars for ever and ever.

 

Who has ears to hear is the one having ears to hear or the one who has ears for the purpose of hearing and functions as the subject of let him hear.

 

Let him hear, or let him listen, is a third person imperative for which English has no equivalent. It means he must hear or he must listen. It is, Let the one who has ears to hear listen or the one having ears to hear must listen.

CONCLUSION:

 

Are you one of the tares or are you part of the wheat? Are you a pretender, or are you genuinely saved? Have you rejected Christ as your Savior, or have you received Him as your Savior?

 

There is a third possibility. You may not really understand the gospel message, and you have neither rejected nor received Christ as Savior.

 

If you have understood the gospel message but completely rejected Christ as your Savior, I cannot help you except to urge you to change your mind if you still can.

 

If you have received Christ as your Savior, I can help you grow and mature as believer; and the best way I can help you is to teach you the Word of God, which I do in Sunday School, the Sunday morning service, the Sunday evening service, and prayer meeting. Take advantage of the instruction readily available to you in these services.

 

If you don’t understand the gospel, I or someone else can also help you by answering whatever questions you may have. Please give me this opportunity. It is up to you.