Matthew 17:22-27

Sunday, June 4th, 2017

JESUS’ PREDICTION OF HIS DEATH

AND RESURRECTION AND JESUS’ ANSWER

REGARDING THE TRIBUTE MONEY

INTRODUCTION:

 

The Destiny of the King includes the narrative about Jesus (13:54 - 17:27).

 

The narrative about Jesus in Matthew 17 includes His transfiguration (17:1-9), His explanation of Elijah’s coming first (17:10-13), His casting out a demon which the disciples could not cast out (17:14-21), His prediction of His death and resurrection (17:22-23), and His answer regarding the tribute money (17:24-27).

We have already looked at verses 1-21 and begin this time with –

    I.     JESUS’ PREDICTION OF HIS DEATH AND RESURRECTION – 17:22-23

 

Once again Jesus advised His disciples that He would be handed over into the hands of men. He will subsequently be killed, but He will also be raised again from the dead.

 

Matthew 17:22 And while they abode in Galilee, Jesus said unto them, The Son of man shall be betrayed into the hands of men.

 

And while they abode in Galilee suggests while they were staying (or living) in Galilee.

 

Jesus said unto them is Jesus said (i.e. declared or asserted) to them (i.e. to His disciples).

 

What He said is recorded in the rest of verse 22 and the beginning of verse 23.

 

The Son of man shall be betrayed into the hands of men.

 

The Son of man is Jesus.

 

Shall be betrayed is is about to be handed over (or delivered).

 

Into the hands of men is into men’s hands and implies into men’s power.

 

Men is the generic term for human beings.

 

Jesus will be betrayed by Judas into the hands of the Jews and will subsequently be delivered by the Jews into the hands of the Romans for crucifixion.

 

Matthew 17:23 And they shall kill him, and the third day he shall be raised again. And they were exceeding sorry.

 

And they shall kill him is a prediction of something which will definitely happen in the future.

 

They refers to the Romans to whom Jesus will be handed over, and him is Jesus.

 

And the third day he shall be raised again is also predictive of something which will definitely happen in the future.

 

The third day is on the third day or within the spatial limits of the third day.

 

He shall be raised again means He (i.e. Christ) will be raised and implies from the dead.

 

Shall be raised again is passive, which means that He will not raise Himself from the dead. God the Father will raise Him from the dead.

 

The disciples seemed to miss the idea that Jesus will be raised from the dead because they were exceeding sorry, which would be a normal reaction to Jesus’ prediction of being killed; whereas, it would seem that they should have been rejoicing at the thought of His subsequent resurrection from the dead.

 

They were exceeding sorry means that the disciples were very (or extremely) sad (or sorrowful).

 

  II.     JESUS’ ANSWER REGARDING THE TRIBUTE MONEY – 17:24-27

 

Matthew 17:24 And when they were come to Capernaum, they that received tribute money came to Peter, and said, Doth not your master pay tribute?

 

And when they were come to Capernaum is understood in the sense of after they (i.e. Jesus and His disciples) had come to Capernaum.

 

Capernaum is a city located on the Sea of Galilee whose location is uncertain today.

 

They that received tribute money is the ones who are collecting the double drachma (or the two-drachma piece (of money).

 

It was . . . a monetary unit . . ., a coin worth two . . . drachmas, but no longer in circulation in NT times; it was about equal to a half shekel (two days’ wage) among the Jews, and was the sum required of each person annually as the temple tax; even though this tax was paid with other coins.

 

The Jewish men whose responsibility it was to collect the temple tax came to Peter, and said, Doth not your master pay tribute?

 

Came to Peter suggests approached Peter.

 

Inasmuch as and said is followed by a question, it is understood in the sense of and asked.

 

What they asked is, Doth not your master pay tribute?

 

Your is plural. As a result it does not refer only to Peter but includes the other disciples as well.

 

Your master is your teacher and refers to Jesus.

 

Pay tribute suggests pay the double drachma (that is due), a reference to the temple tax.

 

Their question anticipates a yes answer in the sense, Your teacher pays the double drachma, doesn’t He?

 

Matthew 17:25 He saith, Yes. And when he was come into the house, Jesus prevented him, saying, What thinkest thou, Simon? of whom do the kings of the earth take custom or tribute? of their own children, or of strangers?

 

He saith, Yes, i.e. Yes, Jesus does pay the temple tax.

 

And when he was come into the house is and when he (i.e. Peter) entered the house.

 

Jesus prevented him implies that Jesus was ahead of Peter in the sense that Jesus anticipated him or spoke to him first. It means that before Peter could discuss what those collecting the temple tax had said to him, Jesus brought up the subject to Peter.

 

Saying introduces what Jesus asked Peter. Jesus’ questions complete this verse.

 

Jesus’ first question is, What thinkest thou, Simon? implies, What do you think, Simon?

 

Jesus’ second question is, Of whom do the kings of the earth take custom or tribute?, i.e. from whom do the kings of the earth collect custom or tribute?

 

Custom speaks of a revenue obligation in the sense of an (indirect) tax, a toll-tax, or customs duties.

 

Tribute speaks of a tax or a toll-tax.

 

Jesus is asking from whom do the kings of the earth collect taxes.

 

Jesus then asks the third question, Of their own children, or of strangers?, i.e. from their own sons or from the strangers? (i.e. from those who are unknown – those who are not their own children)?

 

Matthew 17:26 Peter saith unto him, Of strangers. Jesus saith unto him, Then are the children free.

 

Peter answered Jesus’ question that kings collect taxes from strangers, which led Jesus to state that the children of kings are not subject to taxes.

 

Peter saith unto him means that Peter answers Jesus.

 

Peter’s answer is, From strangers, i.e. from those who are unknown – from those who are not their own children.

 

Jesus saith unto him is Jesus says to him (i.e. to Peter).

 

Then expresses result in the sense of so, as a result, or consequently; and it is emphasized.

 

Are the children free is the sons are free by which He means the king’s sons are not subject to taxation.

 

The children means the children (or the sons) of the king.

 

Matthew 17:27 Notwithstanding, lest we should offend them, go thou to the sea, and cast an hook, and take up the fish that first cometh up; and when thou hast opened his mouth, thou shalt find a piece of money: that take, and give unto them for me and thee.

 

Rather than cause those seeking the temple tax to stumble, Jesus sent Peter to the sea to catch a fish which would have money in its mouth which Peter could then take and pay the temple tax for both Jesus and himself.

 

Notwithstanding introduces a statement in mild contrast to the conclusion that the children are free. It is understood in the sense of but.

 

Lest we should offend them is understood in the sense of in order that we not offend them (i.e. anger them, shock them, or cause them to stumble).

 

Them refers to the Jews.

 

Jesus was born under the law and would abide by it even though He was the Son of God the Father and was not subject to the temple tax.

 

Go thou to the sea has been translated as a command or imperative whose tense indicates that its action must occur before the action of cast. It is literally having gone or having proceeded.

 

The sea is the Sea of Galilee.

 

Cast an hook is cast (or throw) a fishhook (into the sea).

 

And take up the fish that first cometh up continues Jesus’ statement.

 

Take up suggests lift up.

 

The fish that first cometh up suggests the first fish you catch.

 

And when thou hast opened his mouth is understood in the sense of after you have opened its (i.e. the fish’s) mouth.

 

Thou shalt find a piece of money is predictive of something which will definitely happen in the future. It is, You will find a stater. It is a four-drachma coin.

 

That take and give unto them for me and thee is give (it) (i.e. give the stater) to them (i.e. to the ones collecting the temple tax) for me and thee (i.e. for Me and you {Peter}).

 

Two drachmas each or a total of four drachmas for two of them was the exact amount owed by Jesus and Peter.

CONCLUSION:

Scriptures