Matthew 21:1-11

Sunday, August 6th, 2017

THE TRIUMPHAL ENTRY

INTRODUCTION:

 

The Problems of the King includes the narrative about Jesus (19:3 - 23:39), the Olivet Discourse (24:1 - 25:46), and the concluding statement, Matthew 26:1-2(1) And it came to pass, when Jesus had finished all these sayings, he said unto his disciples, (2) Ye know that after two days is the feast of the Passover, and the Son of man is betrayed to be crucified.

 

The narrative about Jesus in chapter 21 includes His triumphal entry into Jerusalem (21:1-11), His driving the traders from the temple (21:12-17), His comments regarding the barren fig tree (21:18-22), His authority challenged by the chief priests and elders (21:23-27), His parable of the two sons (21:28-32), and His parable of the householder who planted a vineyard (21:33-46).

We see that –

    I.     FROM THE MOUNT OF OLIVES, JESUS SENT TWO DISCIPLES INTO BETHPHAGE WHERE THEY WOULD FIND A DONKEY AND HER COLT – 21:1

 

Matthew 21:1 And when they drew nigh unto Jerusalem, and were come to Bethphage, unto the mount of Olives, then sent Jesus two disciples.

 

And when they drew nigh unto Jerusalem is and when they (i.e. Jesus and His disciples) drew near (i.e. came near to or approached) Jerusalem.

 

And were come to Bethphage, unto the mount of Olives is and they came unto Bethphage to the Mount of Olives.

 

Bethphage was a village located on the east slope of the Mount of Olives, on the road going east from Jerusalem to Jericho.

 

The Mount of Olives was located on the east side of Jerusalem.

 

Then suggests at that time.

 

Jesus sent two disciples indicates that He sent these two unnamed disciples to Bethphage to get a donkey and her colt.

We also see that –

  II.     THEY WERE TO LOOSE BOTH ANIMALS AND BRING THEM TO JESUS – 21:2

 

Matthew 21:2 Saying unto them, Go into the village over against you, and straightway ye shall find an ass tied, and a colt with her: loose them, and bring them unto me.

 

Saying unto them is telling them (i.e. the two disciples He sent) or directing them.

 

Go into the village over against you is go into the village ahead of you (or before you), i.e. into Bethphage.

 

And straightway is and immediately.

 

Ye shall find an ass tied is you will find a donkey tied.

 

The tense and mood of ye shall find indicates that this will actually happen.

 

The gender of ass (or donkey) is feminine and the fact that a colt is with her indicates that she is the mother of the colt.

 

The tense of tied indicates that the donkey had been previously tied and that its result continued, indicating that she was still tied.

 

And a colt with her is and a young donkey with her.

 

Loose them (or untie them) refers to both the mother and her colt rather than only to the colt as is made clear by them in verse 3.

 

And bring them unto me is bring (them) or lead (them) to Me (i.e. to Jesus).

Next, we see that –

 III.     IF ANYONE SAID ANYTHING TO THEM ABOUT TAKING THE DONKEYS, THEY WERE TO RESPOND THAT THE LORD NEEDS THEM AND HE WOULD SEND THEM – 21:3

 

Matthew 21:3 And if any man say ought unto you, ye shall say, The Lord hath need of them; and straightway he will send them.

 

And if any man say ought unto you is the condition in a conditional statement.

 

The conclusion is, Ye shall say, The Lord hath need of them.

 

No assumption is made regarding whether anyone will say something to the two disciples.

 

As far as they were concerned, it may or may not happen; but according to Mark 11:5 and Luke 19:33 , it did happen.

 

Luke 19:33 And as they were loosing the colt, the owners thereof said unto them, Why loose ye the colt?

 

If any man say ought unto you is if anyone (i.e. anybody, someone, or somebody) says anything to you (i.e. to you two disciples).

 

Ye shall say, The Lord hath need of them is you shall say, The Lord has need of them (i.e. of the donkey and her colt).

 

And straightway he will send them is and immediately he (i.e whoever says anything to you about untying the donkeys) will send them.

In addition, we see that –

 IV.     THIS WOULD FULFILL A PROPHECY FOUND IN ZECHARIAH – 21:4-5

 

Matthew 21:4 All this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying.

 

All this was done is this has completely (or wholly) happened (i.e. taken place or come to pass).

 

That implies in order that, for the purpose that, or so that.

 

It might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet is, That the thing which was spoken through the prophet (i.e. through Zechariah) might be fulfilled.

 

By the prophet is through the prophet and indicates that the prophet (i.e. Zechariah) was the intermediate agent through whom God, the Direct Agent) spoke.

 

Saying introduces what was said.

 

Its tense indicates ongoing action occurring at the same time as the action of spoken.

 

It was spoken in the past, and it is still saying the same thing.

 

Matthew 21:5 Tell ye the daughter of Sion, Behold, thy King cometh unto thee, meek, and sitting upon an ass, and a colt the foal of an ass.

 

Verse 5 quotes Zechariah 9:9 .

 

Zechariah 9:9 Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold, thy King cometh unto thee: he is just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass.

 

Tell ye the daughter of Sion is tell (i.e. say to or speak to) the daughter of Zion.

 

The daughter of Sion refers to the people living in Jerusalem who represent the entire nation of Israel.

 

Behold is look or you see, and its function is to gain the reader’s attention.

 

Thy King cometh unto thee is your king is coming to you.

 

Thy King refers to Jesus and is speaking of His triumphal entry into Jerusalem.

 

Cometh is comes or is coming and implies that He is on His way.

 

Unto thee is to you and means to you people who are living in Jerusalem.

 

Thy King is described as being meek, i.e. as humble or gentle.

 

He is also described by and sitting (or mounted upon an ass (i.e. a donkey), and a colt the foal of an ass (i.e. a donkey).

 

According to Mark’s gospel, Luke’s gospel, and John’s gospel, Jesus clearly sat upon the colt.

 

As translated in the King James Bible, Matthew’s gospel is capable of being understood to mean that Jesus may have sat on both the mother donkey and her colt.

 

Verse 7 indicates that both the mother donkey and colt were brought to Jesus, that the disciples placed their garments on both animals, and that they set Jesus on them, i.e. on their garments.

 

If Jesus did not ride on both animals, why did the disciples put their clothes on both animals? Perhaps they did not know which donkey Jesus would choose; so, they prepared for Him to ride on either one or both of them.

 

Thus, upon an ass, and a colt the foal of an ass may be understood as indicating that Jesus rode on both donkeys.

 

However, it may instead be understood as upon an ass, even a colt the foal of a donkey and indicate that Jesus rode only on the colt.

 

A colt in this context is a young donkey but old enough to ride on.

 

The foal is a foal or a male offspring.

 

Of an ass is of a donkey.

 

This second use of ass is a different word in the Greek text and means a beast of burden or a pack animal.

We furthermore see that –

   V.     THE DISCIPLES DID WHAT JESUS HAD SAID, BROUGHT THE DONKEY AND HER COLT, SET THEIR CLOTHES ON BOTH ANIMALS, AND SET JESUS ON ONE OF THEM – 21:6-7

 

Matthew 21:6 And the disciples went, and did as Jesus commanded them.

 

And transitions to the two disciples carrying out Jesus’ instructions in the sense of then or so.

 

The disciples are the two disciples Jesus sent to Bethphage to procure the donkeys.

 

Went and did as Jesus commanded them is went and did as Jesus directed them, ordered them, or gave them instructions. They did exactly what Jesus told them to do.

 

Matthew 21:7 And brought the ass, and the colt, and put on them their clothes, and they set him thereon.

 

Jesus’ disciples brought the donkey and her colt, set their clothes on both animals, and set Jesus on one of them.

 

And brought the ass, and the colt is they led the donkey and the colt.

 

And put on them their clothes is and placed (or laid) their clothes (i.e. their cloaks or their garments) upon them (i.e. upon the donkey and the colt).

 

And they set him thereon means that the disciples set Jesus on the garments which they had placed on the donkey and the colt.

Moreover, we see that –

 VI.     A LARGE CROWD SPREAD THEIR GARMENTS ON THE ROAD, AND OTHERS CUT DOWN BRANCHES AND SPREAD THEM ON THE ROAD – 21:8

 

Matthew 21:8 And a very great multitude spread their garments in the way; others cut down branches from the trees, and strawed them in the way.

 

And a very great multitude is and the very large crowd.

 

Spread their garments in the way is spread their own clothes (or cloaks) on the road.

 

A word appears in the Greek text with others but was not translated into the English text.

 

It is the word often translated but or and.

 

Used with others, they mean but others or and others.

 

Others suggests other people.

 

Cut down branches from the trees is were cutting down branches from the trees.

 

The tense of cut down indicates ongoing or repeated action in past time.

 

And strawed them in the way is and were spreading them on the road.

 

Strawed is the same word translated spread in the first part of this verse, but this time its tense indicates ongoing or repeated action in past time.

 

As indicated by the italics, them has been supplied by the translators in reference to branches.

We then see that –

VII.     THOSE PRECEDING HIM AND THOSE FOLLOWING HIM WERE PRAISING GOD AND DECLARING THAT THE ONE WHO HAS COME IN THE NAME OF THE LORD IS BLESSED – 21:9

 

Matthew 21:9 And the multitudes that went before, and that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna to the Son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest.

 

And the multitudes that went before, and that followed is and the crowds who were going before Him (i.e. who were leading the way or who were walking ahead of Him) and who were following (or who were coming after) Him.

 

Cried is were crying or were calling out. Its tense indicates ongoing or repeated action in past time.

 

Saying introduces what the people were crying out.

 

Hosanna is a shout of praise. It is a combination of two Hebrew words which mean help (or save) I (or we) pray and was familiar to everyone in Israel.

 

To the Son of David indicates that at this time the crowds were praising Jesus as the Messiah.

 

Several days later many of the same people might be among those who would reject Him and cry out, Crucify Him, Crucify Him! The Jewish masses were looking for a Messiah who would deliver them from the oppression of the Roman government; but at this time Jesus had come to die on the cross in order to provide for their salvation from sin and its consequences.

 

They then quoted Psalms 118:26 , Blessed be he that cometh in the name of the LORD.

 

Blessed suggests that they were acclaiming Jesus as One Who has been blessed by God.

 

As indicated by the italics, is has been supplied by the translators.

 

He that cometh in the name of the Lord is the One Who comes (or is coming) in the name of the Lord.

 

In the name of the Lord suggests that He has been sent by the Lord as His representative. He has come on official business from the Lord, and He has the Lord’s authority to carry out His will on earth.

 

In the Hebrew text of Psalms 118:26 from which this is quoted, the word translated Lord is Yahweh or Jehovah.

 

For this reason it appears in all capital letters in the King James translation of Psalms 118:26 .

 

Hosanna in the highest suggests hosanna in the highest heavens. The Believer’s Bible Commentary suggests that they were perhaps calling on the heavens to join them in their praising Jesus Whom they regarded as the Messiah or calling on the Lord to save them from heaven itself.

Finally, we see that –

VIII.   WHEN JESUS ENTERED JERUSALEM, PEOPLE IN JERUSALEM WERE ASKING WHO HE WAS; AND THE CROWDS ANSWERED THAT IT WAS JESUS, THE PROPHET FROM NAZARETH – 21:10-11

 

Matthew 21:10 And when he was come into Jerusalem, all the city was moved, saying, Who is this?

 

When Jesus entered Jerusalem, people were asking who He was.

 

And when he was come into Jerusalem suggests and after He entered (or came into) Jerusalem.

 

All the city was moved suggests all the city was stirred up.

 

Saying suggests asking.

 

What they were asking in reference to Jesus is, Who is this?

 

Matthew 21:11 And the multitude said, This is Jesus the prophet of Nazareth of Galilee.

 

In answer to the question in verse 10, the people identified the One Who had ridden into town on a donkey as Jesus, the prophet from Nazareth.

 

And the multitude said is and the crowds were saying (or kept on saying).

 

The tense of said indicates ongoing or repeated action in past time.

 

This is Jesus the prophet of Nazareth of Galilee is, This is Jesus, the prophet, the One from Nazareth of Galilee.

 

Of course, Jesus was far more than a prophet. He was the promised Messiah.

 

At the same time, He was the prophet Moses promised in Deuteronomy 18:15 ,

 

Deuteronomy 18:15 The LORD thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren, like unto me; unto him ye shall hearken.

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